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Need advice working with rough cut lumber.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Jul 3, 2004.


  1. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I am hoping you can give me a tip or 2. I am starting to work on the some nice dry Walnut chunks. I have never worked with pieces of wood that haven't got any flat sides. I don't know how to get 1 flat side so I can create the others. Just to let you know what I am working with I have a 14" band saw a 10" table saw and a 13" planer. Any advice would be great.........Tom
     
  2. One good way would be to mount the piece on a shooting board and run it through the table saw. That way you won't rely on one of the pieces uneven sides as a guide. After the first cut is made, the next ones are easy.
     
  3. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    ThanksI tried doing a search on "shooting board" and came up empty. What do you mean?...........T
     
  4. A board with at least 1 straight edge, wide enough and long enough to hold your piece with some room to spare. Square your wood as best you can to the straight edge of the board and use that edge against your fence as the guide. You'll have to raise your blade but you'll get it square without loosing a lot of material.
     
  5. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Thanks I'll give that a try.............t
     
  6. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    The shooting board will give you one true/flat edge. The hard part will be getting a true face. The jointer is the right tool for this job. If the board is already pretty much true, you can put the thing through the planer and end up with a pretty much true board with parallel faces, but if there is substantial twist or warp, you either need to get good with a jointer plane (hand tool) or get access to a jointer.
     
  7. squarewave

    squarewave Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2004
    Iowa City, Iowa USA
    I think your best bet would be to take the boards to a local cabinet shop and have them give you a true face and a true edge (on the jointer). That will make your life much easier, and it should only cost you $20.
     
  8. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I do have a 6" jointer I forgot to mention that.........t
     
  9. PasdaBeer

    PasdaBeer

    Nov 2, 2002
    Santa Rosa California
    SandStorm Designs
    never tried this on really nice figured woods, but for other rough cuts

    line up your wood on the tabel saw to match the way you want your grain to go ( cut with the grain ) set your miter up at the angle to best fit the wood, and but your fence up to the other side.

    its unsafe, rough, and if you hit any hard wood to make it kick, its a good way to have a chunk of walnut imbeded in your stomach, but in a pinch it works.

    take the now roughly true edge, run it threw the jointer to make it good a flat.
     
  10. squarewave

    squarewave Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2004
    Iowa City, Iowa USA
    If the lumber is not wider than 6", your good to go. Just run the face of it flat on the joiner, turn it up on an edge, with the true face against the jointer fence, true one edge, rip to width, plane to thickness, and glue up the pieces.

    If the lumber is wider than 6", either run it through the planer or take it to a cabinet shop with a wide joiner. The latter would assure a flat board with parallel faces. The former will not necessarily be flat.

    Jeff