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Need help (u probaly havent heard that one befor :P)

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Murtz, Apr 20, 2002.


  1. Murtz

    Murtz

    Jun 27, 2001
    Well here goes...

    The case is im trying out for a music high school,
    and im really not sure of what to play for them.
    Therfor I was wondering if anyone got any suggestions of bass solo's that i could play.
    I can play Pulling Teeth beside that im working on Portraity of Tracy(whit no luck :()
    If u got any suggestions to bass solos that would impress. Thene I would be very gratefully if u gave them to me.

    Thanks.
     
  2. SpeeDFX

    SpeeDFX

    Apr 14, 2002
    Hey, I go to an arts high school, for visual arts, not the bass (I'm just starting the bass now), but my brothers just had an audition for it (he plays the saxaphone) and I was talking to my english teacher (who plays the guitar and was one of the people auditioning my brothers) and he said that a lot of the time, when trying out for a art school or music school, when you play, or what your play, or how technically difficult is, play with feeling, and make sure that the people auditioning you, know that you are play with feeling, instead of just playing the music you learned like a machine.

    PS: Sorry, I just noticed that whole paragraph is a huge run-on sentance, heahea
     
  3. Murtz

    Murtz

    Jun 27, 2001
    lol np thanks for the advice mate :)
     
  4. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    I was in the same situation sort of, looking for a solo to play for a solo performance in my school. I gave up playing Pulling teeth, so now im playing The Awakening by Les Claypool. If you shoose to do this, you wanna get a drummer coz you will sound stupid without one.
     
  5. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Don't worrying about solos so much as playing something that grooves. This is what people usually look for first and foremost in a bassist.

    If you go in there and play only solos, they'll likely think you're a total wank. No offense, but if you went into an audition for a band and played Pulling Teeth and Portrait of Tracy, you probably wouldn't get the gig.

    Sorry, not trying to be an *** here... Show them you can handle various styles. IME this is one thing they really look for, besides the basics, of course. Good luck with it! :cool:
     
  6. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    I agree with that completley, because if you want to stand out in a band by doing solo's IMO you should be playing guitar instead. But just a question thrash_jazz, what kind of peices actually do that,, and then keep it going without sounding too "lonley" without a drummer if you know what i mean.
     
  7. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Or a jazz musician. Or a musician for any style of genre that doesn't showcase a particular timbre.
     
  8. T-Jazz is right on (in my opinion). I teach kids and they're always asking me the same question. I usually suggest that they stay away from fancy solos and keep it simple, but solid. Try to keep it in perspective - you're supposed to be a bassist 1st, a soloist 2nd. (Does that mean something? :rolleyes: )
     
  9. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    I just looked up that word up in the dictonary and it means musical quality :p. So, what your trying to say is that if you want to stand out in a group, you should play with other musicians that arent of a good quality. I know thats not really what your trying to say, but thats the only way i can put it all together. Pardon me if i sound like a smart a** (im not trying to) im just a little puzzled
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Jazzbro' is saying that Jazz can be a sort of "democratic" music where everybody gets to solo or write songs and nobody is necessarily dominant - so I have seen lots of small Jazz groups where the bass player is the leader, main composer and featured soloist. And the audience doesn't think "ooh weird" even when they are fairly ordinary, middle-aged,middle-class people! ;)

    There are types of music where the bass instruments don't have to play a supportive role - they are probably rarer, but if that's what you want to do, then why not?

    I think basicaly though he is saying to keep an open mind about the role of your instrument and be a "musician" first! Maybe not a very practical suggestion in this context, but eminently worthy!


    I mean - last Friday at my local Jazz club - I went to see a quintet that was lead by a drummer!! :rolleyes: He was also probably the best composer in the group and his solo near the end of their concluding number, got the most applause of the night!

    So there! :p
     
  11. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    First off, of course there's nothing wrong with soloing, I just think that if you're auditioning, you might not want to play three solos!

    In answer to the question, I confess that I don't quite see what you mean by "lonely". With the exception of well-crafted solo pieces, any instrument is going to sound "lonely" by itself, IMHO. The best examples of solo stuff I've heard of keeping it going well with one stringed instrument (granted, I haven't heard too much one-instrument stuff) are Victor Wooten's first solo album, the Bach cello suites and New York jazz guitarist Mark Elf.

    Still, I highly doubt that you'd need to play anything as complex as that for a high school audition... they'd probably just want to ensure that you have some basic skills in rhythm, ear, theory and technique.
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Blimey - a one-stringed instrument - now that would be hard and very lonely! :D
     
  13. If you would like to do a Bass Solo, I would suggest something a little less generic. Max Valentino has some incredible songs on his CD, and they showcase the groove and rhythme (i've suddenly forgotten how to spell it) of the bass very well. Mind you they would probably take a while to learn...
     
  14. James S

    James S

    Apr 17, 2002
    New Hampshire
    If it is a typical "school" type of audition they will be looking for a few specific things.

    1. Is your sound good? i.e. clean, strong, pleasant, etc.

    2. Is your bass in tune?

    3. Can you play in time?

    4. Can you read?

    5. Do you know your fingerbaord?

    It is easier for the auditioner to judge these qualities if you do not play a solo. But rather demonstrate these qualities by short examples.

    Perhaps:

    1. One octave and / or two ocatve scales (modes), in time, up and down. This will demonstrate fingerboard profiecency as well as a bit of theory knowledge.

    2. A 12 bar blues bassline. Any style. Just keep the form and the time straight.

    3. A one chord vamp. Again any style just maintain a consistent groove. Be sure to phrase in 4 and 8 bars.

    4. A short, simple, classical piece. Bach (the simple ones).
    Again this wil show command of your instrument and display some musicianship.

    Lastly, if the audition is a week or more away, GET A LESSON from a professional and tell him that you are auditioning and ask if he will help you prepare the above mentioned musical examples.

    Auditions are very important as there is only one chance at a first impression.

    Good Luck (actually there is no luck involved)

    Jim Stinnett