1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Need help with a bow...

Discussion in 'Bows and Rosin [DB]' started by bass_lord_mutha, Nov 1, 2010.


  1. So I am back into double bass playing after a 7 year hiatus, and I just found a good bass for a killer deal, and came across a used bow at the music store I work at for next to nothing. The name on the bow is J. Dvorak, and I've been doing online searches trying to find any info on it, and all I can find is that it is a pernambucco bow with an octagonal shaft that seems to sell between $525 and $599. Can anyone here offer any input on this bow other than what I've got?
     
  2. Maxvla

    Maxvla

    Nov 1, 2010
    Oklahoma City
    Oklahoma Strings
    Are the fittings nickel or sterling? If the bow is new and indeed is pernambuco, $500-700 would be an appropriate price for a nickel mounted bow. Sterling would be closer to $1k. A brazilwood bow (nickel mounts), however, would be more in the $250-400 range.

    You can almost always tell nickel from silver by looking at the flare at the frog side end of the bow screw. If there is a smooth flare it is nickel, if there is a ridge in the middle of the flare it is likely sterling. If it is a German style bow, of course, you can't use this method to tell, since the screw is usually ebony instead of metal.

    Sight the bow like a rifle with full playing tension and check for any warps. Check the bow for any minor damages or evidence of repair. Make sure the frog is properly fitting on the facets of the bow and that the screw turns smoothly, but not too loose. Loosen the bow entirely pushing the frog into the bow as far as it can go. If the hair is hanging from the stick by more than 1/4" demand a rehair, unless that particular day is excessively humid, and even then not more than 1/2". Lay the bow on a table with the ferrule (metal band on front bottom of frog) flat and the tip flat. Make sure there is plenty of camber (curve) left in the bow. A bow that has lost it's camber will be flimsy and hard to play with.

    Sterling example:
    [​IMG]

    Nickel example:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Yes it does have nickel fittings. It is a used bow, probably could use a rehair but it's not too bad, still has a nice grip to the strings. I'm not too keen on the differences between pernambuco and brazilwood, though I've read that pernambuco is the heartwood of the tree it comes from and is quite dense, and the wood of this bow is definitely very hard and tough, but pretty light and well balanced. Woodwind/Brasswind has a J. Dvorak bow on their site but the screw is different. The one I'm looking at is solid nickel with a pearl inlay on the end and the one on the site has a black stripe (ebony?) going around the center of it.
     
  4. Maxvla

    Maxvla

    Nov 1, 2010
    Oklahoma City
    Oklahoma Strings
    As long as the bow is straight it should do a fine job for you assuming you are getting a great price on it. I normally suggest buyers to go with a sterling bow if they can afford it. The silver plating on the nickel bows will come off sooner or later and will never look good again, but a good deal is a good deal. If it plays nicely for you, grab it and enjoy.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.