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Need help with Zoom B9.1ut

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by ejb11235, May 22, 2012.


  1. ejb11235

    ejb11235

    May 22, 2012
    I just purchased a used Zoom B9.1UT. It's my first effects unit of any kind, so I'm enjoying it quite a bit.

    I have one problem with the switch underneath the expression pedal. This switch is designed to allow you to turn modules on and off if you press the expression pedal fully down. But when I press the pedal down, it bottoms out on the stops before actuating the switch. Everything seems to be properly fastened and what-not, and I've seen another poster who described the same problem. Is there supposed to be a cap or something that fits over the switch to raise it up? Perhaps this is removable and gotten lost along the way?

    I know the switch works because I can press it with my finger and it performs as described in the manual.

    Thanks

    --eric
     
  2. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    From the trouble shooting section of the manual (pretty sure your problem is anwered in the last line here):

    ■ Expression pedal does not operate
    properly.


    • Check the expression pedal settings (→ p.
    31).

    • Adjust the expression pedal (→ p. 33).

    ■ On/off switching with expression
    pedal does not work properly


    • Check whether parameter 4 (module on/off)
    of the expression pedal vertical direction
    setting (PV1 – PV4) is set to "Enable".

    • The expression pedal horizontal direction
    setting (PH1 – PH4) does not allow module
    on/off switching.
     
  3. ejb11235

    ejb11235

    May 22, 2012
    Thanks, but the problem is mechanical not electrical or configuration.
     
  4. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    My zoom is packed away and I don't feel like getting it out to check, but the manual is talking about the button not working if you have the pedal set for the horizontal position. That sounds mechanical to me. I havent used the pedal itself much, but I vaguely remember something like that being true. I think you may need to give the manual a good reading. Pretty sure your answer is this as stated in my first post

    • The expression pedal horizontal direction
    setting (PH1 – PH4) does not allow module
    on/off switching.

    If not, sorry then. Can't help ya.
     
  5. ejb11235

    ejb11235

    May 22, 2012
    I've read the manual cover to cover -- it kind of goes with the territory of purchasing a unit like this. That part of the manual you are referring to is saying that you can only do module switching using vertical motion, and that there is no corresponding functionality with horizontal motion. The problem is that the pedal isn't physically touching the switch. The mechanical adjustments available are to adjust the pressure and torque, not physical position. The pedal cannot move down any farther because the stops molded into the pedal casting hit the case, as they are designed to. As I said originally, I can push the switch with my fingers and it performs as it should. I guess I'll fit a cap over the switch to make it higher.
     
  6. Snapman

    Snapman

    Apr 3, 2012
    How hard are you pressing it down?
     
  7. Wrathkayu

    Wrathkayu

    Aug 29, 2012
    As ejb11235 says, this is a purely mechanical problem. Let's walk it through:

    1) The pedal has a range of vertical travel from fully up/back (e.g. volume = min.) to fully down/forward (e.g. volume = max.). At each end of the vertical travel the feet on the underside of the pedal come into solid contact with the upper surface of the instrument case. @Snapman: thanks for your input, but there is no springiness or sponginess, it is a hard landing at each end. No matter how hard you try to push the pedal further down/forward, it just sits hard on the deck and does not move.

    2) With the pedal fully down/forward, and with its front feet sitting on the hard deck, an air gap of about one-eighth inch still exists between the lower surface of the little flat grey plate bolted to the underside of the pedal and the top of the push-switch. This air gap cannot be closed, nor can the switch be pushed down, by further attempts to push the pedal down/forward. This is what ejb11235 meant when s/he said "when I press the pedal down, it bottoms out on the stops before actuating the switch". No physical mechanism exits on the instrument as supplied to alter this fact.

    3) If you purchased your B9.1ut new, then the carton it came in is decorated with photos which show the machine from all sides. At least 2 of the photos show the push-switch sitting under the pedal without any cap or other extension that would make it tall enough to bring it into contact with the pedal in the fully down/forward position. So no parts have been lost in transit, so to speak -it was just built that way.

    4) The user manual assumes that the pedal does mechanically operate the switch since it mentions, in the section on calibrating the pedal, that in order to calibrate the maximum setting the pedal must be pushed right down and then released, whereupon it will spring back slightly to the dead-maximum position. This instruction is commensurate with the pedal making physical contact with the push-switch and pushing it down, whereupon the push-switch forces the pedal slightly back up again when you take your foot off it.

    5) Apart from that one reference to mechanical interactions between the pedal and the push-switch, the user manual confines confines itself exclusively to the programming of the switch. @Joe Nerve: thanks for your input, but programming references are not relevant to the present problem.

    The bottom line is that either there is a basic design fault with the instrument; or, a part (e.g. a cap to fit over the push-switch) was designed in but was omitted from the assembly at the factory.

    I agree with ejb11235 that the best solution, short of attempting to engage the manufacturers over this, would be simply to fit a hard rubber cap over the button on the push-switch.

    Hope this helps!
     
  8. Wrathkayu

    Wrathkayu

    Aug 29, 2012
    Update: I took a ca. 1 cm square of adhesive-backed felt (that you stick under the feet of furniture to stop them scratching the parquet floor) and pressed it to the little plate on the underside of the pedal. Voila! problem solved and it costs zilch and is done in an instant. No messing about trying to get a cap that will fit on the switch. Let's hope it stays stuck on (operating temperatures etc.)...
     
  9. KenHR

    KenHR

    Jul 28, 2010
    Waterford, NY
    Thanks for this, Wrathkayu. I was just searching around to see if anyone had the same issue as I started really messing with the settings on my b9 this week rather than messing with the presets.
     
  10. Wrathkayu

    Wrathkayu

    Aug 29, 2012
    You're most welcome KenHR. Actually in my case the gap turned out to be ca. 2mm so a couple of layers of gaffer tape would probably have solved the problem and no slicing your fingers up getting the felt down to the right thickness!

    New problem: has anyone experienced the volume jumping up when switching patches? A small nudge on the pedal seems to remind the new patch what its volume level ought to be, but still annoying as I have to remember to switch and waggle on the fly.
     
  11. Bruski

    Bruski

    Aug 30, 2012
    Boston, MA
    I too had this same issue. I knew it was mechanical and not a software issue. I got some double sided sticky magnet tape. it still needs to be "Crazy-Glued" to stay on permanent. I wanted to check the Threads to make sure I wasn't the only one, before I did that... Now that I know, I will...
    Thanx ALL!
     

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