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Neil Peart on the disappearance of drum solos

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Dave Siff, Jan 23, 2006.


  1. I would gladly give back the drum solos, if the drummers would stop abusing my ears throughout the songs. I think a 12 or 16 bar solo is plenty for any instrument (and no more than once per set) and the rest of the time they need to be blending with the others.
     
  2. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    First sentence of the article:
    I don't think Moonie ever played a solo.:eyebrow:
     
  3. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA

    Are you serious? There would be songs where Moon would be soloing practically the whole song. It was part of his style. But he "soloed" in context of the song while the Ox kept it steady.
     
  4. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    Peart freakin' solos for at least 10 minutes a show! I know for a fact that I would grow weary of it if Victor Wooten soloed (as in by himself) for more than a minute. I don't know, I don't like solos. Peart is an amazing soloist, but he's just too much.
     
  5. burntgorilla

    burntgorilla

    Jan 24, 2005
    Belfast
    I'm not really a bit fan of solos as a whole. Guitarists can get away with it, because it's expected, but I hate it when there's only one guitarist, and the song loses it's drive when they go off into the higher frets. Of course, a proper solo can be amazing, but I find many solos are more technical exercises than anything else. John Petrucci is a good example. He has a great solo on Sacrificed Sons, but so much of his work is high speed sweepings (which can be great at the right time).

    A drum solo is amazing when it's done right. If you get a chance to see Rush's R30 DVD at any point, there's a great solo on that. I think the sheer size of his drumkit helps though, since he has such a wide range of tones to play with, discounting his glockenspiel type thing. If all you have is a hihat, snare, kick, tom and a few cymbals, it would be far harder to change feels and moods like Peart can.
     
  6. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    He played busy, but he didn't "solo". There was never a 10 minute wank-fest like going to see Van Halen. Alex bored the whole crowd for at least 10 barely tolerable minutes.
     
  7. plexibass

    plexibass

    Jun 30, 2005
    moon never really soloed, i have about 500 who boots and no solos. the little solo in WONT GET FOOLED AGAIN is about as close as he came. in the later john entwistle days, john's solo during 5:15 was freakin' awesome. i wish his estate would authorize a 4 or 5 cd box set of outtakes, rehearsals, live and just general screwing around. that would be be sweet.
     
  8. SteveC

    SteveC Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    I think NP's solos are in a different catagory than most drummers. The solo is well planned and practiced. There are basic rudiments and other exercise-type sections. It uses MIDI triggers for a big band accompaniment (probably inspired by his big band CD) and more. Not just some wild bash and crash wanking.

    Most everyone I show it to is quite impressed and never bored.
     
  9. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    Very few drummers can be musical in a solo performance. It takes more than chops it takes musicality. Bill Bruford can do it.
     
  10. Bard2dbone

    Bard2dbone

    Aug 4, 2002
    Arlington TX
    Terry Bozzio can, too.
     
  11. mwlaurenson

    mwlaurenson Guest

    Feb 5, 2001
    scotland


    I'll see if I can burst a few peoples bubbles with this:eek:

    I saw Rush live and during Peart's solo I could see the guy at the sound desk triggering some of the midi parts for the big band section.

    Makes you wonder about what he was up to during the rest of the songs...
     
  12. d8g3jdh

    d8g3jdh Guest

    Aug 9, 2005
    In terms of physical coordination, this is something like playing badminton with two rackets while typing with your feet.

    I like that analogy.
     
  13. Great analogy. That makes it about 67% as difficult as playing pedal steel since we have both hands, both feet and both knees working.
     
  14. purfektstranger

    purfektstranger

    Apr 10, 2003
    Canada
    "I'll see if I can burst a few peoples bubbles with this

    I saw Rush live and during Peart's solo I could see the guy at the sound desk triggering some of the midi parts for the big band section.

    Makes you wonder about what he was up to during the rest of the songs..."


    Not at all...I was sitting 50 feet away with a side angle of Peart during Rush's last R30 tour and Peart kicked a$$ the whole show. Yes he combines electric and acoustic drums in his solo but the hard work is there.....it always has been.
     
  15. canopener

    canopener

    Sep 15, 2003
    Isle of Lucy
    Mitch Mitchell had some great solos recorded.
     
  16. SBassman

    SBassman

    Jun 8, 2003
    Northeast, US
    I happen to like solos, but my limit is at about 2 minutes.

    I saw the Peart solo on the latest DVD. It's great and all, and I love NP, but it was definitely too long for me.

    A bit too contrived. I'd rather see 1 or 2 minutes from somebody's heart than 10 minutes of orchestrated Stuff.
     
  17. purfektstranger

    purfektstranger

    Apr 10, 2003
    Canada
    ahh you see but I am an ex drummer and seeing Neil Peart play solo for any stretch of time is pure bliss to me......
     
  18. SBassman

    SBassman

    Jun 8, 2003
    Northeast, US
    Me, too.
     
  19. Yogi Bear

    Yogi Bear Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2000
    Colorado
    Mike Portnoy could learn much from that article. All guts and no glory so to speak.