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New Accugroove?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by CaptainWally, Jan 19, 2004.


  1. CaptainWally

    CaptainWally Supporting Member

    Oct 21, 2000
    Sandy Eggo, CA
    Hi everyone (Mark?),

    Wasn't there intimation there would be new goodies unveiled at NAMM?

    Pics? Specs? GAS?
     
  2. They have a new neodymium line of speakers. This brings the weight of the 1x12 cab down to around 45 pounds, and the Whappo Jr is around 70-something. They also have switchable impedance (eight or four ohms) on the control panel! Awesome...they sound incredible.
     
  3. I thought they were going to have some new signature cabs. I can't remember who, maybe Steve Lawson??? I'm getting old, and my memory ain't so good. Plus my wife says I make things up, so I could be completely wrong.
     
  4. Yep, the Steve Lawson signature cab is a Tri110 with a 250 watt power amp built in. I didn't get to hear this particular cab, but the Tri110 is a rad box, so I'm sure it sounds excellent.
     
  5. I bet it does sound great. Very interesting. I didn't know they were going to build a combo? Hmmm....
     
  6. Whappo Grande

    Whappo Grande

    Feb 9, 2002
    Santa Clara, CA.
    Manager: AccuGroove Speakers
    Steve Lawson making everything he touches just sing! He's setting on the new Tri 112L.

    [​IMG]

    Alan Caron plays while in stunned disbelief at our Tri 110L cabs. They actually produce a very solid B string & sound a big as a 2x10.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    Mark,

    I've got a question regarding the new option of impedance switching on your cabs. I don't claim to be a highly technical guy so bear with me, please! :)

    As with anything that is manufactured there is the potential for failures to occur. My question what protection would your product offer the user? In other words, how can one be assured that when switching to either the 8 or 4 ohm load that the desired load will be achieved? Thanks in advance.
     
  8. Tri-208 good for URB and ABG?

    I did notice on the website that the tri-208 cab had an update in 2003. Any plans to make the cab lighter? Also curious to hear anyone's experience with this cab.

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
  9. Whappo Grande

    Whappo Grande

    Feb 9, 2002
    Santa Clara, CA.
    Manager: AccuGroove Speakers
    As a bass player, I've been plagued with the impedance issue for 34 years. Do I invest in 8 or 4 Ohm cabs? It seems that no matter what my choice, sooner or later I wish I had purchased the other.

    The Patent Pending AccuSwitch is a labor of love, not a marketing gimmick. It has taken years to accomplish for the sole purpose of relieving the frustration of players like myself.

    The bottom line to your question is that it either works or it doesn’t. There is no motivation for me to come out with a product that wouldn't do what it says it will do. After all, good news travels slowly & bad news travels fast.

    Top level touring pros beat it up on the road & hundreds tested it at NAMM. It really works. In addition, Bass Player Magazine will be doing a test review real soon. I hope this helps a little.

    Mark
    AccuGroove.com
     
  10. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    If you do a little searching on both this forum and the Double Bass amplification forum, I have posted a decent amount regarding my experience with Accugroove cabs. My first experience was an extended trip to Low Down Sound in Detroit, where I played through the Tri 208, the Mini Whappo, and the Whappo, Jr. In these prior threads, I have posted a goodly amount of detail regarding my experience.

    In short, though, I was very impressed with these cabinets. In fact, I have recently acquired a Whappo, Jr., and I look forward to gigging with it for the first time this Saturday. I may have to ask Mark about a retro-fit for that impedeance switch, though. That's brilliant!

    To answer your more direct question, while I did not have an ABG or URB with me at the time of my audition of the Tri 208, I did get a very good feel for its tone and how it responds. I believe it to be very much in the same ballpark as the EA VL-208, of which I own several, and have had numerous ABG and URB experiences. The VL-208 is a very versatile cab that sounds great on electric, acoustic and upright bass, and I strongly suspect that the Tri 208 will be equally impressive on each. If I had to attempt to distinguish between the two (without being able to directly A/B them), I'd say that the Tri 208 probably has a bit more going on in the low end, and the VL-208 has a bit more going on in the upper mids. Still, they are pretty comparable. Both are rather polite, accurate cabs. The VL-208 can take a good amount of power (which I know from firsthand experience), and I don't know that the Tri 208 could match it in that regard. However, I suspect that at lower volumes (such as, say a recording studio - the environment in which I would most likely envision a Tri 208 excelling), the Tri 208 is going to be more tonally balanced and accurate, especially in the low end. It handles even a low B just fine. It just doesn't move a ton of air.

    For a somewhat more agressive sound, but equal tonal balance and utter transparency, you may want to check out the Mini Whappo. I really fell in love with the incredible sound, especially for its size. Ultimately, though, I wanted to move more air (some of the guys I play with can get pretty loud), which is why I opted for the Whappo, Jr.

    For ABG and URB, I'd wholeheartedly recommend either the Tri 208 or the Mini Whappo. However, it looks like Mark might have a few more cabs brewing that could really shine in this application as well.

    Hope this helps, Tom.
     
  11. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    Mark,

    Your reply helps a great deal and I was not suggesting that the AccuSwitch was an unreliable gimmick in any way. Nor did I intend for you to divulge any trade secrets. ;) I guess that my concern or question was simply if there was some way of confirming that the desired load/impedance had been reached after switching without using a multimeter?

    I'm glad to hear that that real world use of the design has been successful and I look forward to the BP review. I'm sure that a lot of the things that I'm curious about will be answered then. Thanks for the reply! [​IMG]
     
  12. Whappo Grande

    Whappo Grande

    Feb 9, 2002
    Santa Clara, CA.
    Manager: AccuGroove Speakers
    No problem; I never took it as such. I knew it was just an honest question my friend.

    Mark
    AccuGroove.com
     
  13. Well........
    Let's have one of your great posts Tom.
     
  14. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    Why, certainly!

    I ran the Whappo, Jr. off my rack rig (Raven Labs MDB-1, Eden Navigator, PLX 3002), and let me tell you that I had PLENTY of volume! And get this, I was only using one side of my PLX 3002, so that's just 900w instead of the 3,000 that I could have with it in bridged mono. The first thing that hits you about the tone of the Whappo, Jr. is that it is full, thick, and that it has plenty of deep low end. And this is with the casters on. In fact, at first, it sounds too full, and I expect that further up the fingerboard, my notes will be buried in low end. But nope, there they are as well! Really, with that much low end, I thought that my mids and highs would be buried, but they are all very well balanced. However, I did notice that I didn't have the same amount of crisp high end that I get with my Epifani cabs, nor the upper mid articulation that I get with my VL-208's. This is because I was playing with all my EQ controls set flat - something that I have come accustomed to do since moving on to higher quality gear. After discussing this observation with Mark Wright, he stated that Accugrooves were designed to be EQ'd to your hearts desire, and to respond well to reasonable EQ efforts. I'll be darned if he isn't right! Well, we know he's "Wright", but... At any rate, you can crank up your high end on an Accugroove cab, and you won't get hiss (unless your pickups are providing it), as you can with many other tweeters. And you can crank the upper mids without it sounding boxy. I'm not saying that I can't successfully tweak the EQ with my other cabs, but just that the Accugrooves seem to act more neutral than other cabs, and you can fine tune your sound using your EQ without worrying about how too much boost or cut is going to interact with your cab's inherent sonic characteristics.

    Set flat, the Whappo, Jr. is very neutral sounding, with full, smooth balanced articulation across the fingerboard. However, having grown accustomed to a bit more sparkle to the highs, and a bit more forward upper-midrange attack, I simply dialed it in on my Navigator, and there it was. I do have to EQ a bit more than I do with my EA cabs, but the end result with the Whappo, Jr. is very, very good. And talk about loud! It's amazing that a cabinet that small (and the Jr. is not dainty, by any means) can get that loud! One nice feature about the low end is that I know for a fact that the room that we were playing in tends to reinforce any inherent resonance in my cabs in the frequency range of 55-80 Hz, or so. Oftentimes, I have to find that resonance, and dial it down a bit with my parameterics. On the Whappo, Jr., I didn't have to mess with that at all. The low end seemed pretty consistent, without any noticeable hump or inherently sympathetic resonance.

    I will say that I am probably going to look into a Tri 210L (or perhaps another cab - a VL-208 would do nicely) to sit atop my Whappo, Jr. for gigs where I have to stand closer to my rig. It's nice to have some drivers closer to ear level in those situations. The Whappo, Jr. is certainly a keeper, though I must say that I am not about to start selling off my VL-208's. However, the WJ versus two VL-210's is an upcoming experiment... ;)

    Tom.
     
  15. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    After playing my Whappo, Jr. again last night, and giving it a critical listen against several of my other cabs, I feel the need to post an addendum to my prior comments on the Whappo, Jr. Above, I stated that to get the sound that I was used to hearing out of my rig, I had to boost the upper mids and the highs somewhat. While this would get me back closer to my preconceived tonal balance, I think after careful listening that what I am hearing is not so much that the Whappo, Jr. is lacking in upper-mids or highs, but rather that since it is so full sounding, and has so much low end and low-mid presence (without sounding bloated, BTW), that my ears perceived less upper-mids and highs. This is really an exceptional cab, and it is taking me a while to fully appreciate it. The two words that I keep using are "full" and "smooth", and boy, do both of them apply. It is certainly also very "loud", and I also feel that "uncolored" applies quite well. It is tweaking my notion of what a "balanced" sound is. In some other cabs, I had attributed a balanced sound to an even volume response for notes played on all strings, and all over the fingerboard. But, I kind of expected that I wouldn't necessarily be hearing low end when I am playing above the 12th fret on the G-string. With the Accugroove, though, even the highest notes sound full and have some lower foundation to them. Do you know how on most cabs, when you start monkeying around up high, sometimes you lose the tonal foundation in a band setting (and usually the drummer starts complaining, because now he has to keep time for himself)? Well, I don't know how they do it, but the Whappo, Jr. remains full even when I'm noodling around up high. Very impressive.

    Just wanted to add that bit of a revelation.

    Take care, Tom.
     
  16. The idea of an impedance switch just sounds too good to be true. When switching between 4 and 8 ohms, does the efficiency of the cab change?
     
  17. TomB
    Great review, thanks very much.
    I'm pretty geared out for now, but that sure tantilizes my interest sharing your passion for gear. My love affair with gear has been tamed for awhile with my Bergs and WWU etc. The only true way to "have it all", it to have them all..... You're pretty much there my Friend! I'm gonna have to try and get together maybe when all nasty winter weather calms down since we are only 4-5 hours away. My cousin lives near Columbus and should go visit Her sometime....but really I want to visit with you and your stuff :D Of course I will load my van up with all my gear for you to check out.
     
  18. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    That sounds like a great way to beat the winter dulldrums, especially once the nasty weather clears out. Hopefully, we can coordinate a weekend when my wife and kids visit her family in Cleveland, so that way we can shake the house with impunity!

    Looking forward to getting together sometime, Tom.
     
  19. Sounds like a plan. We will pm when it's looking good. My kids are all grown and I'm sure my lovely Wife will find something to do. :bassist:
     
  20. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000
    How much did the impedance switch add to the retail cost? Was the engineering to develope this switch very time/labor intensive?

    I'm asking because this is somthing that we've needed for a long time and I'm curious as to just how this industry responds to our needs compaired to fashion.

    Powered cabinets...absolutly. Take a hard look at the Carver-Pro ZR amplifiers. By far the most controlled amp I've had in my subwoofered rig.

    Once again, Bravo AccuGroove!