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New Andreas Eastman Bass

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by acidbass, Jul 10, 2004.


  1. acidbass

    acidbass

    May 26, 2004
    CT
    :D I just picked up a new Andreas Eastman fully carved bass, model 605 since im going to ithaca college next year. I have just a few questions of the upkeep of it. I know to wipe the rosin off of it after im done playing and all of the basics, but one question in particular; what should i use on the finish to keep it as shiny and great as it is now? Also, any suggestions for humidifiers????
     
  2. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Congrats! (Did you mean the model 65?)

    I, personally, like the patina that varnish gets over time. A shiny bass strikes me the same way a brand new pair of shoes did back in my high school days. It was very uncool in the early 80's.

    A room humidifier is the best way to go if you're in a particularly dry environment (forced-air heat), and a lot of folks use dampits -- though there are detractors to this, citing horror stories of water damage to the bottom block from over-wetted dampits as well as those that say that they do nothing as they are too small to hydeate enough air to make any difference. (Spit that last sentence out in one breath) I just keep an eye on my hygrometer, and as I have old-school radiators in my apartment and live right on the ocean the humidity never gets very low.
     
  3. 1. Get a hygrometer. They're cheap, the information they give can be priceless.
    2. Ithaca ? Yeah, they'll have the heat on. If you need one, Sears makes the best humidifier that I've seen. Fairly priced.
    3. When it comes to agents for polishing/cleaning the bass, I'm a believer in Less Is More. Did I say Less Is More? Oh, my god another thread. Don Z, Bob Branstetter, I'm sorry.
    Sorry acid, that was an inside joke. But yes, gently brush off dust and rosin flakes with a soft cloth and be sparing with cleaning agents. I have no scientific basis, that's just my hangup. If somebody can prove that there's no harm to the varnish, I'll change.
    Luthiers?
     
  4. azflyman

    azflyman

    Apr 24, 2004
    Astoria, OR
    Dude, you should know you can't post about a new bass here and not post some pics. :scowl: Get on that digital camera and show us your new baby. ;) Congrats on the new bass!

    az
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Agreed about the hygrometer. There are all kinds of humidifiers on the market, and if you trust your hygrometer, you can keep your bass very happy, which will in turn keep you very happy. You'll also be surprised how much you'll enjoy hanging out in the room with the decent humidity level. If it's your practice room, so much the better.


    Isn't that just a passive-aggressive way of saying that More is Less? I fear a potential posting frenzy ahead. :help:

    Seriously, there's a thread or two around here about cleaning the bass, with lots of good stuff from the Lluthier types. I'm sure it's in the "Newbie Links" either here or in Setup and Repair.
     
  6. I have this habit of visually checking my bass out...maybe once a month. Looking at the seams with a flashlight. Even taking a good look inside. Looking for cracks inside and out.
    I also lean the bass against something and look at the bridge from all angles making it sure it's not been bumped and is exactly straight and not on it's way to being warped.
     
  7. Wyzird05

    Wyzird05

    Dec 1, 2003
    South Bend, IN
    I use a microfiber cloth on my EBs and DB just to get the oils from my fingers off the instrument. I think 3M makes them for computer monitors, the ones I own are the 16x16 from woodwind and brasswind.
     
  8. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    For the bridge Shank has a great idea. We put wax-pencil marks where the feet of the bridge are supposed to be and I carry a tape measure with a mark where the string length is supposed to be. Between the two you can quickly determine if your bridge is where it's supposed to be and the angle is right.
     
  9. Another thing about string length: write it down. You think you won't forget, but you will.
    I use a soft lead pencil and a straightedge to mark the bridge feet positions.
     
  10. acidbass

    acidbass

    May 26, 2004
    CT
    Heres the only good picture of my new bass that i got... more on the way hopefully.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002


    I tried that with my wife once...she didn't like it.
     
  12. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Try candles. More romantic than your halogen work light.
     
  13. I said" looking for cracks" Not "in" cracks! :rollno:
     
  14. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    Ohhhhhhh. Maybe that was my mistake...
     
  15. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    My wife has the body of a 20 year old.


    She should give it back though, she's getting it all wrinkled...
     
  16. Jesu Christo, (thanks Ray) Ed! :eyebrow:
     
  17. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    "Hi, Mrs. Fuqua ? yeah, no, you don't know me but go to www.talkbass.com..."
     
  18. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    SOMEONE ACTUALLY MARRIED ED? :eek:
     
  19. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Nah, the woman I know about is smarter than that. I think Ed was just repeating a joke. :eyebrow:
     
  20. Life as Mrs. Ed Quafftwo would never be boring...