Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

new bridge bigger than stock

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by bassist4ever, Jun 25, 2002.


  1. okay i want to get a gotch 206 bridge to replace the "bender" that is on my essex but the stock bridge is only 40mm wide and 80mm long and the gotch is 60mm wide and 82mm long...
    so would i mount the new bridge where the strings mount on the old one?(as in mark the spot and line up the rear of the new bridge with the mark?)
     
  2. That Gotoh is technically a "drop-in" replacement for the bent tin style bridges of Fender. I would mark where the vertical tail is and see if the Gotoh comes close to that when lined up with the screw holes. If it's close (and that could be within 1/8") then you can go ahead and mount it there. The saddles have enough adjustment to compensate the intonation.
     
  3. the 201 is the drop in replacement. and the 206 has 5 screws also but they are two in front one in the middle and two on the back i do believe...
    and its the 206 im goign to get....

    so just line the backend up? and adjust intonation/action from there?
     
  4. ooop's - you are correct - I got the numbers backwards.

    You've got the idea. There are other ways to do it also:

    1. Measure 17" from the 12th fret, mark this point, then adjust the new saddles to their midpoint of travel and install the bridge with the saddles centered on the point you marked.

    2. Using the old bridge as a guide, mark the average location of the saddles then adjust the saddles to midpoint of travel and center them on this mark.

    Either method will put the bridge in a decent place. The reason you might want to use one method over another is if there is some problem with the size of the bridge being too large for the body or it's contours. Like on a Jazz, the angled (in relation to the strings) rear contour can sometimes make a replacement bridge fit just a little tight. Another situaltion is whether you have an instrument that has thru-body stringing. Sometimes one method is better than another because it puts the bridge in the right spot in relation to the body holes for the strings.