New Build, Bastard 4 string Silver flake

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Hopkins, May 28, 2016.

  1. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Its been a while since I have done a build thread,

    Specs,
    Body: Poplar 2 piece body
    Neck: Maple neck, rosewood fretboard, MOP block inlays (Allparts unfinished neck)
    Pickups: Super 55 Jazzbass pickups
    Electronics: Undecided on if this will be active or passive.
    Hardware: Hipshot B bridge, Ultralite Tuners all black.
    Finish: Silver flake on a silver base.

    The body blank is in clamps at the moment, pics to come in the next update.
     
  2. MrArose13

    MrArose13 Commercial User

    Aug 15, 2011
    Atlanta Georgia
    Owner/Luthier:RoseBud Basses & Guitars LLC
    OOOO...AHHHHH... I'm in.
     
  3. earlysecond

    earlysecond In Memoriam

    Jan 26, 2016
    I'm in. . . .been waiting for you to build, don't think you have since I have been here, at least not a bass.

    Hard to go wrong with the Super 55's you recommended them and then I bought one and it IS good.

    OK, so now we are just waiting for the glue to dry.
     
  4. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Cleaning up the blank in the drum sander

    20160528_173900_zpsinzumaqf.jpg

    Poplar isn't the prettiest wood in the world, but it works easily and finishes well.
    20160528_174350_zpsikuuyua7.jpg 20160528_174404_zpsx8jjjv8v.jpg

    Neck pocket cut. I routed a dummy pocket in the unused part of the blank to test the fit.
    20160528_181526_zpsjslxb6ys.jpg

    Roughed out the body on the band saw then cut it to size with a flush trim bit. Its time to invest in a new but because this one is dull. I'm going to invest in a down cut spiral flush trim.

    Whoops
    20160528_183636_zpsm91vqmnz.jpg

    The broken piece broke cleanly and was easily glued back in place

    20160528_184307_zpso1jplwqd.jpg

    It doesn't get much better than this
    20160528_184411_zpsckn76erq.jpg
     
  5. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Sub'd for silver flake on silver base goodness.
     
  6. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    It needed 137 stitches but it healed nicely

    20160528_213502_zpsr4hycmic.jpg

    I need to straighten some waves out of the sides, then tomorrow I will rout the pickups and do the round over.
     
  7. MrArose13

    MrArose13 Commercial User

    Aug 15, 2011
    Atlanta Georgia
    Owner/Luthier:RoseBud Basses & Guitars LLC
    Well done Sir!
     
  8. Rôckhewer

    Rôckhewer Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 28, 2015
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Owner/Builder- RockHewer Custom Guitars LLC
    At the risk of sounding like a broken record, (I've made this case before).... just get that dull bit sharpened!!
    If it's just a cheap straight flute, I understand you may not want to go to the trouble of taking it to a sharpening company, (but they can make that kind good as new for about $10)
    But when the time comes that the spiral bit you invest in gets dull....It is so worth looking into!
    A solid carbide spiral (especially a nice 3 flute) is going to set you back well over $100....and they can sharpen those for around $20

    Now you might say..."If I get a flush-cut bit sharpened it won't cut perfectly flush any more"!.....And you'd be correct. It will cut a few thousandths proud of the template...depending upon how much carbide they had to remove to make it right. (if there are any chips that need ground out, etc...)
    BUT while that may be problematic for crucial things like neck pockets....it will still work fine for cutting out body shapes!
    I'd keep a good flush bit for pickup & neck pockets only, that will stay sharp a long time with such limited use. AND another one that can be sharpened several times for all other heavy cutting tasks.

    If anyone is about to throw away a bit just because it is dull....and don't want to get it sharpened... please...send it to me! I'll pay for shipping;)
     
    rllefebv likes this.
  9. Rôckhewer

    Rôckhewer Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 28, 2015
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Owner/Builder- RockHewer Custom Guitars LLC
    How do you like that drum sander?
    What grit are you running?
    Is it 110V or 220V ?
    About how much can you take on a single pass?...I mean...like if your body blank had a joint with about 1/64" to 1/32" un-even lip...,could you flush it up in a single pass? or a couple passes?

    I'm curious because have used a drum sander before that was an old P.O.S. and it bogged down & was very un effective.
    But since the company I work for moved to the new location...the owner will not let me hook up the wide belt sander, due to the fact that that piece of equipment would require a $20,000 "spark detector" to be installed in the exhaust system to be in compliance & pass inspection!
    That was my favorite machine, as I could make any thickness veneer / accent laminate etc.. that I desired.
    Since wide belt sanders are so expensive, I was considering purchasing a drum sander for myself, as a next best option.
     
  10. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    This particular bit is not really worth getting sharpened. After I get the spiral bit I will definitely be sending it off for a sharpening as needed. This one is just an inexpensive Wood River (Woodcraft house brand) 2" flush trim. I definitely got my moneys worth out of it ;)

    This one has a 1.5hp 120v motor on it, and requires pretty light passes. I could level off a 1/64" lip in one pass, but 1/32" would be pushing it. Right now I am running 120 grit, which is a pretty good all around grit for the machine. I need to replace the feet table belt, and do some shimming on the table, and I may step up to a 3 hp motor. I had a Delta machine that was much more powerful that could take a pretty heavy pass, but the height adjustment was junk, and parts are not available for it. I may redesign the mechanism and get that machine running again.
     
  11. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I started working on routing the pickup cavities this morning.

    Started with layout and location
    upload_2016-5-29_10-15-6.jpeg

    Removed most of the material with a forstner bit
    upload_2016-5-29_10-15-54.jpeg

    Then routed it with 1/2" pattern bit, and cleaned up the corners with a 3/16" pattern bit on my trim router
    upload_2016-5-29_10-17-57.jpeg
    upload_2016-5-29_10-18-27.jpeg

    These little bits do a great job for cleaning up the corners of a rout
    upload_2016-5-29_10-19-15.jpeg

    It should have been rinse and repeat for the bridge pickup cavity, but my little router bit cut its last. So I am at a stand still until a replacement comes in.
    upload_2016-5-29_10-21-4.jpeg
    upload_2016-5-29_10-23-35.jpeg
     
  12. rufus.K

    rufus.K

    Oct 18, 2015
    SoCal
    Darn
     
  13. rllefebv

    rllefebv

    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
    It died a warrior's death. Send it to Valhalla without mourning!

    -robert
     
    CatSquare likes this.
  14. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    LOL that's for the other thread, this one doesn't have a fantasy novel attached to it :D
     
    michaelwayneharwood likes this.
  15. Rôckhewer

    Rôckhewer Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 28, 2015
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Owner/Builder- RockHewer Custom Guitars LLC
    I typically am not a huge fan of single cut body styles.... but I really like this shape.
    It has a bit of "flare" and style to it while retaining a conservativeness so it isn't over the top weird.
    A nice aesthetic balance.
    Nice work!
     
  16. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Thanks buddy, I knew I hit a home run with this model the first time I drew it up. Its a combination of a Tele and Jazz bass so it has the offset contour of a Jazz with a tele upper horn. Its a classic Fender look without being anything that has really been done before.
    Orange%2BBastard_1.jpg
     
    INTP, nerkoids, Freekmagnet and 8 others like this.
  17. Rôckhewer

    Rôckhewer Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 28, 2015
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Owner/Builder- RockHewer Custom Guitars LLC
    Sweet!
     
  18. Whoa... It's like if a Telecaster and a Jazz Bass had a love child...

    How does it balance?
     
  19. earlysecond

    earlysecond In Memoriam

    Jan 26, 2016
    Just when you get it a groove. . .snap. I bought one of those after we talked about it (tiny router bit) I'm hoping I can learn some finesse techniques as I continue to learn.

    Hopefully most if my stuff is too new to suffer breakage. . . .never say never.

    It won't hold you back much I am sure.
     
  20. gsnad2000

    gsnad2000 Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2011
    Boston
    Owner of Wrong Way Customs
    Key is to use the little bits as Hopkins shows above, remove all the material you can with a beefier bit. Then clean up the corners with the little guy.