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New First Bow...Now What?

Discussion in 'Bows and Rosin [DB]' started by terryjj1, Jul 27, 2012.


  1. terryjj1

    terryjj1 Guest

    Jul 19, 2012
    Just received my first ever bow from string emporium...seems nice...I guess...it was recommended I get a bow for intonation practice..fair enough...now what?..the rosin needs to be applied.....is this something I should undertake myself or get assistance?..how easy is it to make a mess? Is applying a little too much rosin mean the end of the bow? It's the least expensive bow i have but even at $130 a pop, I'm not keen on screwing up and having to replace....

    thanks
     
  2. chris1125

    chris1125

    May 14, 2007
    Just swipe the the rosin on, long strokes from the frog to the tip. Since it's new, you'll possibly need quite a bit to start. It's not the end of the world if you over rosin, it will play out. Have fun!
     
  3. terryjj1

    terryjj1 Guest

    Jul 19, 2012
    ok..I can do that....thanks...
     
  4. FWIW, from a beginner: The bow is a mysterious beast. The smallest difference in pressure, angle, location on the string, can change the sound.

    I have been bowing long scales for the past few weeks as practice, and I feel like I am worlds away from getting a consistent tone. What sounds good on one note sounds different when I finger another note on the same string. being at different places on the neck required me to move the bow vertically up or down the string to get a better tone.

    It may be different on each bass, but finding that consistent push and pull, in the right place, consistently, is a very difficult thing. And what they say about being able to hear yourself out of tune much better with a bow, it's totally true. Being an electric bass splayer I can fudge around on some things and mimic some of my favorite tunes that I like to play on electric, and even though my intonation is atrocious it's enough to fool people who don't know any better. But the bow really brings out your flaws, which is a good thing, though an aggravating thing.

    Have fun with it. I am!


    joe
     
  5. terryjj1

    terryjj1 Guest

    Jul 19, 2012
    oh no...It's going to make me sound worse?...this is not good!
     
  6. The bow tells all! I have a jazz student right now that I make practice scales with a bow. It becomes very aparent to him just where the intonation is suffering. Things are so exposed and obvious with the bow that it is hard to ignore when something is not quite right. I encourage you to continue working with the bow and gaining some experience. As far as rosin is concerned, try not to use too much. If it is a newer bow that hasn't been primed, you may have to recharge it more often but with experience, you will know just how much will get the job done. Good luck!
     
  7. terryjj1

    terryjj1 Guest

    Jul 19, 2012
    Mr.basic,

    that is SO true about the scales and the horrible sounds that come of it..I tried some scales this weekend and yes, it was awful...there is no allowance for inaccurate finger positioning..I closed the windows in the room I was in...it was interesting though to play for the first time with a bow...here's another question for you all:

    when rosining (?) a bow, does one glide the bow both ways on the rosin, as if bowing or one way only?..

    you're also right about having to rosin up the bow as it's new..i greased it up the first day..by the next days it wasn't catching as well.....not sure of all the "terms" to use when describing what I've done..please feel free to correct\edit...
     
  8. Matt Ides

    Matt Ides

    May 12, 2004
    Minneapolis, MN
    Most apply frog to tip with a few swipes.
     
  9. troutmask

    troutmask

    Nov 22, 2011
    Houston, TX
    Don't depend too much on the rosin though, best to be able to play with as little as possible in my opinion. It'll take a while to get used to it. Try bowing the strings which both hands on either side of the the bow to see how it's hitting the strings with the least amount of pressure, speed of stroke etc.. I would spend much more time concentrating on open string bowing at the beginning and trying to pull a consistent tone and dynamics before even trying scales. Start at faster tempi, and slow down gradually. I try to keep my arm as limp as possible to where if the strings weren't there my arm would fall to my side; and Remember to use your arm/shoulder to bow not your hand (unless you're a rabbathian of course). All is subject to the player though, people's preferences differ greatly, find what works for you.
     
  10. terryjj1

    terryjj1 Guest

    Jul 19, 2012
    sound advice....the bow gives the bass a totally different sound..I will be putting new strings on this weekend..thomastick spirocores medium...we'll see how it sounds then...
     
  11. Matt Ides

    Matt Ides

    May 12, 2004
    Minneapolis, MN

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