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New guy

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Rhune, Sep 15, 2000.


  1. Rhune

    Rhune

    Sep 14, 2000
    Hi there, my name is Rich, I bought a used Pevey T-40 last year as my first bass, the deal wasn't bad, 200 bucks got me the guitar, amp, cord, and a couple pedals. Now that I've learned I'm looking into getting ssomething new, I have had my eye on an Ibanez, but am not sure really what I want, I wanted to know who makes the best basses, and/ or what models have a comfortable feel and good sound.
    Thanx
     
  2. extreme

    extreme

    Mar 20, 2000
    Welcome aboard!

    IMO, Warwick makes killer basses at a reasonable price...

    What are you looking for in a bass? What are some bands or styles or sounds that you want to pursue? The best thing you can do is visit a few music stores and play as many basses as you can get your hands on. There are many great instruments out there, but some are going to feel and sound great to you, where some other ones might really speak to me. The Fender P and J are basically the standards across all styles and situations; you couldn't really go wrong with either of these. I hope this helps!

     
  3. extreme

    extreme

    Mar 20, 2000
    Rich,

    What do you like about your Peavey T-40?
    What don't you like about it?

    Your feedback should help us to point you in a more specific direction. Later...
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    This does get asked a lot of times and I think we generally agree that no one manufacturer is "best" for everyone. People might have a "favourite" but this is really personal preference.

    What feels "comfortable" to you might not feel the same way to someone else - until you try a bass and see how it feels to you it's impossible to say whether it will suit you or not.

    And what is "good sound" to you, is again a matter of personal taste and what you like. Only you can say what you like and nobody else can decide this for you. If you said - I like this bass sound on this particular record, someone can probably tell you what bass was used, but this doesn't mean you'll sound like that - just that you will have a slightly better chance of doing this! ;)

    "Need more input"
     
  5. gmstudio99

    gmstudio99

    Mar 11, 2000
    Cleveland, OH
    Welcome to the board. What Bruce said is pretty much true. When you ask "what's the best brand" type of stuff, what you'll get is a bunch of people pretty much telling you the brands they own. They're both defending their "turf" (hey, I'm guilty of it, too) and at the same time, telling you what THEY like for themselves.

    One way to get aquainted with manufacturers and models is to just start wading through the posts here in this forum.

    My only advice is beware of those that use words like "hate" or "suck" to describe brands. "Hate" is too subjective to be truly helpful to others, and, really, no brand "sucks"...

    Good luck, and happy hunting! :)

    -GM
     
  6. jcadmus

    jcadmus

    Apr 2, 2000
    No, both Bruce and GM are wrong. There is only one bass you should buy, made by the only manufacturer you should consider. Superior crafsmanship, excellent playability, killer tone, the definitive bass guitar -- all for $199!!!

    And the name of that bass is....GASP!....HEART...ATTACK!...CAN'T...
    BREATHE...THE...NAME...OF...THAT...BASS...IS...Aaauggh...

    ;)

    No, these guys are right. You're question is just too general. If you can provide a little more info, like what style of music you play, how loud you play, what kind of amp you use, what you like and dislike about your current gear, and probably most important your price, we can probably help steer you.

    But generally, the best thing to do is play a LOT of basses to find what you like. Welcome and have fun!
     
  7. Deynn

    Deynn Moderator Emeritus

    Aug 9, 2000
    Iowa
    Welcome Rich!

    I can only add my aggreement, with what has already been said. Just remember that...YOU are the one playing the bass and YOU are the one to please with your choice...:)
     
  8. Doug

    Doug

    Apr 5, 2000
    Buffalo, N.Y.
    Welcome to the board!!!

    First, everyone here is right. The best bass is very subjective. However, I also understand your situation. If you don't have any idea what brands are considered quality, then where do you start looking? If you're not giving a starting point, you may wind up trying out and purchasing some piece of garbage which you may regret later. I will throw some names out there for you, and it will be up to you to try these out and find which ones you like.

    Ibanez
    ESP
    Fender
    Musicman
    Lakland
    Warwick
    Peavey, which you are somewhat familiar with.
    Carvin
    Jackson
    Conklin
    Pedulla
    Rickenbaker
    Dean
    Spector
    Ken Smith

    These are some I can think of at this time. Each manufacturer has different models, based on price and features. So you will need to pick through those as well. I know I left off a ton, so if I left off someone else's favorite, it wasn't intentional. They all have some quality built in. See what's available at your local music stores. Try them out. Look at the craftmanship, listen to the sound plugged in and unplugged, see which one is more comfortable. Read as many articles on these basses as possible. Get some feedback from here or from friends. Take your time and make the right decision for your playing style. Eventually you will pick the one that's right for you. Good Luck!
     
  9. 5156246

    5156246

    Sep 6, 2000
    Germany
    you just go out and spend 1 or more days in the biggest bass store around, checking out every available bass there.

    The one that you can afford and you like best ---> TAKE IT!
     
  10. I would suggest going to a big store like Guitar Center and spending a couple of hours. You probably will be attracted to a certain style of bass and you'll probably think that style or 'look' fits you. You'll probably also start to think in terms of which color or finish appeals to you. You'll likely have a budget and will see that some of the instruments are out of your price range. Your choices will probably be narrowed down before you even try playing one, but go ahead and play em all anyway. I don't think in terms of a bad brand, because it seems to be more a matter of assembly and quality control. The common example of this is the Mexican made Fenders for $300. Some are outstanding instruments and some are junk. Same deal with Fender's Asian made guitars. Some great, some crappy. If you have an experienced friend go with you, he can look at an instrument and determine if it is well put together. If you don't have a friend, just hang around the music stores long enough to get advice from a stranger. I know, your Mom told you not to talk to them, but eventually you'll see a kindly rock and roller and he'll show you what to look for with the neck, nut, bridge etc. You'll be amazed at how different basses of the same make and model sound from each other, especially with lines like the Mexi Fenders and Squiers. The feel of the neck is important to me and I find some brands and models easier and more comfy to play. I like the Fender Jazz bass for all of the above reasons, but I would play a bunch of them and pick the one I like. Guitar Center and Mars are tuff because the instruments are often not set up properly and you can't give them a good test drive, but if a bass appeals to you, ask them to get off their fat ass and set it up for you. Those big stores do offer the lowest prices and they have a thirty day return policy which should take the risk out of any purchase you make. If you are lucky enough to live near an owner operated music store, do your research at GC and then go buy it from the little guy. The difference in price will be well worth the technical support you'll get. Set up is everything on a bass and a new instrument may need tweaking several times before it settles down.
     
  11. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    The only thing I can add cos Rick said it all (hello Rick) is if you are still stuck come back here and ask about reliabilty and customer service about actual models then balance out the horror stories with the its great ones.
    I will repeat the Mex Fender thing I have a Strat that is awesome but I tried about 20. Happy hunting and come back here often anyway its good to have different people to argue I mean talk to (dry English humour no smiley :) D'oh )
     
  12. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    Check out the pawn shops too. sometimes someone gets unlucky and loses a nice bass. you may find one you like there and the prices are usually pretty good.
     
  13. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    My second bass was a T-40 (after some druggy stole my '65 P-bass) and, surprisingly, I still have fond memories of that thing. It had a pretty good range of tones. I could never play it now, though; I'm just to old to lift it. I sold it to a guy who runs drill rigs, and he still has it (it's over 20 years old), but he complains to me that the neck is bowed ... I don't think it's ever had a setup ... imagine that.

    So anyway, why don't you think about a Jazz bass, American-made if it's in the budget, otherwise a Mexican one. But like somebody else said, play a whole bunch of 'em before you make your selection. They are pretty variable from guitar to guitar.