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New stuff from my shop...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by erikbojerik, Jul 16, 2008.


  1. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Amazing.... And all this time I used to think that big round light in the sky at night, led me to the bar.;)

    Cool stuff Erik.
     
  2. Georynn

    Georynn

    Dec 4, 2007
    Memphis,Tn
    DANG, Look at the big brain on Erik!!!




    I didn't know you were a scientist!!! Thats awesome.
    That makes you a big nerd (in a positive way)!!
    Congrats!!
     

    Attached Files:

  3. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    That is so cool. And I'm very jealous of your job.
     
  4. Marcury

    Marcury High and Low

    Aug 19, 2007
    Mid Hudson Valley, NY
    Wow, very cool. Can you make fretboard dots out of them?
     
  5. Hehehe....besides breaking all sorts of NASA rules and a few laws, they would be so small that you'd never see them. They're about this big --> .

    Not only that, but if you consider the cost of the Apollo missions and translate that into a cost-per-bead, I think they'd be very expensive. :eek:
     
  6. chris.gotfunk

    chris.gotfunk

    Mar 21, 2007
    Ashburn, Va
    A real Clark Kent. Although, I am not sure which one is the Superman job.......since this is TB....I would say luthier is the Superman job.
    Congrats on the article and the find. Tre' cool!!!!!!
    Peace,
    Chris
     
  7. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Pretty cool your voice comes out good too.....t
     
  8. Marcury

    Marcury High and Low

    Aug 19, 2007
    Mid Hudson Valley, NY
    Yeah but i'll bet they'd sound better than clay dots!!! :D
     
  9. asad137

    asad137

    Jan 18, 2007
    Minneapolis
    Physicist
    Imagine the mid-hump you'd get from moon rocks! :)

    Asad
     
  10. RLK

    RLK

    Apr 15, 2006
    Clinton Township, MI
    I was reading about that earlier this week.
    Very, Very, cool(?)

    I understand if you blow off the following questions (especially in a TB forum)
    (I read just enough, and watch just enough Discovery Channel to be a pain) :rolleyes:

    • At impact, could water-containing-material (WCM) have been expelled from Earth into a more segregated path?, a path that might have come into play later in the proto-moon’s formation?
    • How “cool” would the proto-moon have to be for that kind of WCM to survive?
    • Would it have been possible for that “cooler” proto-moon to incorporate that kind of WCM?
     
  11. scottyd

    scottyd Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2006
    Waco Tx
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
    MMMMMMM moon water...
     
  12. [caveat]
    The only "giant impact" of this kind that has ever been observed through a telescope was the 8 (or so) pieces of comet Shoemaker-Levy that crashed into Jupiter a few years ago....not exactly analogous to the supposed moon-forming event for the Earth. So this giant impact theory is exactly that....a theory....but a theory that has been shown to be extremely likely (statistically speaking) during solar system formation....so likely that it is probable that all the inner planets experienced at least one, and probably more than one, before reaching their present masses. The giant impact is also really the only viable theory that can explain the angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system. It has been the subject of some pretty fancy computer simulations. Many of these simulations are very high-quality, but because of CPU limitations they all make simplifying assumptions about some key parts of the physics involved. Having said all that....
    [/caveat]

    A "cool" giant impact, one which does not completely melt the Moon, is one very likely scenario. All the simulations done to date suggest very high temperatures during and immediately after the impact, but I'm not sure that all the variables have been fleshed out fully (impact direction, angle, velocity, relative impactor masses, etc), and none of these simulations have been done with an atmosphere for the Earth.

    One problem with a "cool" giant impact is that the Moon's crust is full of the kinds of minerals (feldspar mainly) that float on a magma ocean, which has long been taken as supporting evidence for a high-energy giant impact. But this doesn't necessarily mean the ENTIRE Moon was once molten.
     
  13. I'm surprised Jens Ritter hasn't used them for side dot material.
     
  14. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    If he hears about this, he will. ;)
     
  15. RLK

    RLK

    Apr 15, 2006
    Clinton Township, MI
    Thanks for the reply!
    (AND for speaking in "101" terms I could understand).
    Didn't realize a "cool" impact could be a possible scenerio.
    I was speculating maybe the (survivng) water-containing-material came into to play during a later, cooler phase of a "hot" impact scenario.

    Wilser,
    That Ritter side dot comment; LOL!!
     
  16. Ritter will probibly use them on his next bass:D
     
  17. Damn.. It would help if I read the entire thred before posting my smark-alek remarks. :p
     
  18. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Mar 7, 2021

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