1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

New to bass - Is SS more common on bass?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Jessestr, Aug 16, 2017.


Tags:
  1. Jessestr

    Jessestr

    Aug 16, 2017
    Hi

    I owned a bass before... sold it and now I'm back :). Regretted it immediately. However I was wondering if in the bass guitar world SS amps are more common then tube amps, if yes: why?

    In the guitar world you only hear about tubes. I own an Orange CR120 which is SS for my guitar and sounds wonderful.

    For bass I recently bought a TC Electronics BH250 with a BC210 cab. Would it take pedals well? Can't find too much about it!

    Thanks!
     
    Buster Brown and Killed_by_Death like this.
  2. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz

    May 26, 2010
    Depends on how much money you want to spend and how strong your back is.

    As far as your rig you just bought taking pedals well, I hate to sound like a jerk, but since you already bought it, why not run your pedals through it and tell us first hand?!
     
    RaggaDruida likes this.
  3. guitarrophobe

    guitarrophobe

    Mar 20, 2017
    Bass guys aren't as obsessed with "only vintage-stuff is any good" as guitar guys and are more open to new things.

    Plus for bass you need a lot of power which would require a lot of tubes and result in a large price tag.

    So yeah, SS is more common.
     
    slugger, jthisdell, The Rage and 2 others like this.
  4. Jessestr

    Jessestr

    Aug 16, 2017
    On the first answer, not really what I asked!

    Second answer: Good point. I don't have any pedals yet, I thought the BH250 would be a good starting point because of the TonePrint functionality.

    Thanks! Clear answer :)!
     
  5. blubass

    blubass

    Aug 3, 2007
    Modesto Ca
    Current: Blackstar, DR strings, Nady. Previous endorsements with: GK, Rotosound, Ernie Ball, Cleartone, EMG, Dean, Dava Picks, Rebel Straps, Dickies
    Yes, they're more common. A great way to check this, is to go to your favorite music store on the internet and search bass amps. MF lists...

    23 hybrid (tube preamp, SS power amp) amps
    64 solid state amps
    14 tube amps

    That's for the most part current market stuff, though there may be some clearance mixed in.

    Your amp will accept pedals just fine.
     
    RaggaDruida likes this.
  6. Jessestr

    Jessestr

    Aug 16, 2017
    Didn't think of that! Thanks.

    The reason I ask about the pedals is because in the "guitar world" people say that pedals on a SS amp suck. But not sure if that's true or not.
     
  7. guitarrophobe

    guitarrophobe

    Mar 20, 2017
    Guitar sound is too a very large part about the signal being overdriven to a smaller or larger degree. This is something that tubes excel at and that requires a huge amount of effort with an SS-amp.
    If you are not a sucker for crunch etc don't worry too much.
     
  8. blubass

    blubass

    Aug 3, 2007
    Modesto Ca
    Current: Blackstar, DR strings, Nady. Previous endorsements with: GK, Rotosound, Ernie Ball, Cleartone, EMG, Dean, Dava Picks, Rebel Straps, Dickies
    There's always gross overgeneralizations when the proverbial they get involved. The only thing to truly be concerned with is how it sounds to your ears. Once they start telling you and posting on forums that pedals suck in front of SS amps, it's good measure to take what's said with a grain of salt.

    The best way to keep them busy and out of a bassist' business is to confine them all into a YouTube channel comparing Kemper/Bias Head/Helix/Axe FX amps against the real thing. You find out real quick how ignorant they can be.
     
    PsyDocHill, Dgl44, Hoyt and 1 other person like this.
  9. 800 watts at 6 pounds, can sit unnoticed in the corner at a small coffee shop or church gig or rip your face off loud at a metal show. Yes solid state class D rules.
     
  10. beans-on-toast

    beans-on-toast Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2008
    People choose an amp for different reasons.

    New bass players favor sand state amps because they are more affordable.

    Many more experienced players may use tube amps because of the desired tone.

    Players that require high power, greater than 300W, generally have no choice but to go with solid state.

    Players that want light weight and portability go with solid state.

    Players that desire a particular tone that only comes with a specific classic tube amp, go with those amps.

    There's a wide range of choices available that suit different needs.
     
  11. lfmn16

    lfmn16 Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2011
    charles town, wv
    My Ampeg PF800 - 12 lbs., my SVT Head - 85 lbs. Ampeg PF800 - $599, Ampeg SVT CL - $1799.

    SS definitely doesn't sound like tubes. That doesn't mean they don't sound good, it just means they don't sound the same. For most people, close enough is good enough.

    When we have roadies I always use my SVT.
     
    Duder, CATFISHMcC0Y and J-Bassomatic like this.
  12. matante

    matante

    Nov 3, 2003
    Los Angeles
    There are also many players who prefer solid state amps for bass, regardless of price, size, and weight.
     
  13. matante

    matante

    Nov 3, 2003
    Los Angeles
    Many bassists also prefer the sound of ss and have no desire for the tube sound whatsoever. There's also that.
     
  14. lfmn16

    lfmn16 Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2011
    charles town, wv
    I didn't mean my list to be a comprehensive list of ALL possible reasons. Maybe you could post your's all by yourself because your reason has nothing to do with mine. :thumbsup:

    I'm not sure why the SS guys are so sensitive. :rollno:
     
    nbsipics likes this.
  15. matante

    matante

    Nov 3, 2003
    Los Angeles
    His question was asking about bass players in general, not about our personal preferences.
     
  16. Nev375

    Nev375

    Nov 2, 2010
    Missouri
    Allow me to explain the first answer.

    Bass amps require at least 3 or more times the wattage to be heard at a similar perceived volume as a guitar amp.

    So to build a tube bass amp to compete with guitar amps you are going to need much more money to purchase and maintain it compared to a guitar amp and also they have large transformers which make them very heavy.

    So, he really was answering your question.
     
    khutch, CATFISHMcC0Y and Crater like this.
  17. Dp1363

    Dp1363

    Jan 8, 2011
    New Jersey US
    I own a 5lb solid state head and 40lb tube head (with custom flight case 70lbs) and I'll use my tube head 9 times out of 10 due to the amazing tone. I do bring the SS as back up.
     
    P-oddz likes this.
  18. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz

    May 26, 2010
    Guitarists have the luxury of being able to still use tube amps and not have to break their back carrying their rig.

    Basically there's no cut and dry answer to your question, and it can't be based on if your amp is tube or solid state. It comes down to whether or not your choice of gear will work well together, as in the sum of the many parts you choose to put together and use. You may find out that your particular combination might not work for your situation while some other guy may think it sounds great and is exactly what he was looking for. It's kind of trial and error, same as it is in the guitar world.

    I'd personally be suspicious of someone who says that SS amps suck, or these pedals ONLy work with this type of amp (but yes, some manufacturers do make a pedal with a specific type of amp in mind, like the Crowther Hot Cake, which does better with EL84 equipped amps), but still can sound great with a Fender amp that has 6L6, 6V6, etc.
    Thanks for elaborating more eloquently on what I wrote. I figured most on here would understand what I meant. In the last band I played in, which was a a 7 piece that had 2 singers, 2 guitar players, bass, drums and pedal steel, the other guitar player and I both used Princeton Reverbs which were 15 watt vintage tube combos, while the bass player used an older Fender Rumble 350. We weren't a quiet band, but also didn't play ear-splitting loud (alt-country/rock).

    Takes way more effort and energy to reproduce the low notes compared to the mid range the guitar occupies, so if you want to go all tube, it's going to cost you in both dollars and muscle!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017
    Nev375 likes this.
  19. I read "takes pedals well" in reviews, but I don't think I've ever read "does not take pedals" well.
    So, my conclusion is, all amps take pedals well & people who tell you differently are probably blowing smoke.
     
  20. Nev375

    Nev375

    Nov 2, 2010
    Missouri
    Also the notion that solid state isn't any good for guitars just isn't true.

    The Roland JC120 and Lab Series L5 are two examples of legendary SS guitar amps favored by several great players.
     

Share This Page