New to URB, specific tone wanted

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by subsonic87, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. Hi, I currently play bass guitar and am looking for a good URB. I was originally considereing an EUB, but the opinions in these threads has made me think twice about the tone I would be getting (to clarify, how different are URBs and EUBs in tone? Is the difference more than something only a virtuoso would appreciate?). I am really tempted by the insane deals going on at, and am considering the Eberle laminate model. However, there is a specific tone I am after. Is anyone familiar with Kris Doty of the Five O'clock People? I love her bass sound and tone, and she has inspired me to consider the URB. Basically, I want to sound just like her (she has this awesome percussive booming sound. In a good way). I could email people some mp3s if they are interested in helping a URB noob out. Thanks.
  2. More than likley, the sound you want has more to do with set-up, and the player. All basses are different. Buying a bass made by the same company or person ain't gonna help.
  3. That's exactly what I meant. I wanted some help for a noob regarding set-up, strings, length (maybe?), etc. for a specific sound. I'm not anywhere near experienced enough to do it on my own. More generally, I was wondering if this specific tone could be achieved with an EUB. Tony Levin has used an EUB to great effect, but it just doesn't sound that much like a real DB.
  4. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    I think you might be disappointed here...sorry.... To paraphrase what Paul said earlier (although I'm not qualified to tote his rosin): Anything that anyone might recommend in terms of bass brands, strings, setup, etc won't be of much's all so subjective to the bass and the player. You might hear 10 players play the same exact instrument and each might get a different tone. Your best bet is to play as many basses as you can find, and buy what's closest to the sound you're hearing. Then get a teacher to help you develop the technique to get the rest of it.
  5. Oh, OK. Thanks, guys. I'll look into local teachers (and perhaps luthiers).
  6. FredH

    FredH Supporting Member

    I listened to a couple of clips of the band you’re talking about.
    What I hear is more of a processed sound than a straight miked output. This is good since just about any playable bass you can get will get close tone wise.
    I'd guess you could take the output of a piezo pickup put it through a compressor then change the attack/decay according to the sound you want. But I should add the disclaimer "I am retarded when it comes to electronix's..."

    Talking to a teacher is pretty sound :smug: advice.
  7. Wow. Thanks a lot for taking the time to do that. It's good to know that the sound is easy to reproduce. I'm still hovering in indecision about actually getting a DB (I've contacted a local luthier, Doug Heydon, about any DBs he has in stock), but it seems to me that even if I do and don't like it, that DBs retain their value so well that I wouldn't lose much cash if I did decide to sell. I don't know. They just seem so hard to play.
  8. JeffKissell

    JeffKissell Supporting Member

    Nov 21, 2004
    Soquel, CA
    Subsonic, Try contacting the artist in question, maybe she could answer some of your questions. It never hurts to ask.

  9. Said artist is currently wherabouts: unknown (maybe even has stoppped playing bass), but I think I might have managed to track her down by name to somwhere in Idaho. I think I'll send her a letter, email is out of the question, as googling her does nothing.
  10. JeffKissell

    JeffKissell Supporting Member

    Nov 21, 2004
    Soquel, CA
    Good luck on your quest, though you may find that once you spend some time on the Double Bass dark side, your true voice will emerge.

  11. John Sprague

    John Sprague Sam Shen's US Distributor

    Mar 10, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Sales Manager, CSC Products Inc.
    Hey Sub,
    Welcome to TB/DB! Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to visit a whole bunch of bass shops and play a bunch of instruments til you find one that meets the budget and gives you a good feeling about the tone. Living in Oregon, there are plenty. Warning: bass shops are spooky places, there isn't a slab bass in site, the oldest, rattiest looking instruments command the highest price tags, their proprietors speak in arcane terms, they often times wear aprons and have sawdust in their hair, and call the bass parts different things than slabbers, like "fingerboard" and "scroll". Scary, but mostly harmless.

    Here are the Oregon dealers that I know of:
    Pete's Bass Shop in Portland: 503-777-7027
    Cat Man Music in Estacada: 503-630-3827

    Then on up to the Seattle area:
    Hammond Ashley: 206-878-3456
    The Bass Church: 206-784-6626

    I'm bet there are more, try a look at Bob G's luthier's driectory for more listings.

    Good luck!