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Newbie in Need

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Newbie101, Mar 22, 2001.


  1. Newbie101

    Newbie101

    Mar 22, 2001
    <B>Help!</B>

    I just need some really basic answers, I would be very grateful if someone could shed some light on a few things for me.

    <LI>What is the real difference between a "Bass Amp" and a normal "Guitar Amp"?</LI>
    <LI>What type of Stack is good for bass?</LI>
    <LI>I've never restrung my bass before, what kind of strings are good and what's the best procedure?</LI>
    <LI>I've been playing on a the same bass for about 3 years now, at the time I bought it, it was recommended to me by my a salesman at my local music store. It's a "Shane" bass. I've never seen another one like it, so I'm assumeing that it's just an "off Brand". If so, what would be a good bass to buy? But I like the way it plays more than some of the other more expensive basses I've played....but that's not saying much if my bass it the one I learned on.</LI>
    <Hr>
    Ok, so maybe their not the mose <b>SIMPLE</B> questions...lol

    Thanks for help.
     
  2. I've found D'addario Slowounds pretty nice sounding

    (if you prefer a warm sound; their not the brightest thing in the world)
     
  3. OK, I don't know much detail but I'll try...

    What is the real difference between a "Bass Amp" and a normal "Guitar Amp"?
    >>>Bass Amps are built to handle the lower frequency ranges of bass.

    What type of Stack is good for bass?
    >>>Whatever you like the sound of best... I play an Ampeg SVT2 all valve head through 2x trace elliot cabs: 1x15" and 4x10" - it sounds (and feels) great. Big stack move more air, bass is best when played really damned loud... Oh yeah!

    Valve amps are known for a warm, furry sound while solid state amps have crisper,harder tone in general.

    Basically, you need to know what you want your bass to sound like and how loud (where) you want to play. Try out every amp you can get your hands on, then buy the amp that fits the bill.

    I've never restrung my bass before, what kind of strings are good and what's the best procedure?
    >>>Depends on what you like. Heavier gauge strings (thicker) are boomier that lighter gauges, they also place more tension on the neck. personally i find i can feel that when playing & i dont like it. lighter strings are looser... it's all down to taste... try them all out and see which is best for you.


    I've been playing on a the same bass for about 3 years now, at the time I bought it, it was recommended to me by my a salesman at my local music store. It's a "Shane" bass. I've never seen another one like it, so I'm assumeing that it's just an "off Brand". If so, what would be a good bass to buy? But I like the way it plays more than some of the other more expensive basses I've played....but that's not saying much if my bass it the one I learned on.
    >>>once you get used to an bass, other basses sometimes dont seem as friendly, no matter what they cost...

    !!!! you've had the bass for 3 years and have never re-strung it!!!! you;re going to have a shick when you get fresh one son there. it'll sound like different insrument!

    for instruction on how to restruing your bass go to bassplyer.com and search... there's a step by step guide on there somewhere.
     
  4. if ya like to slap then get roundwound strings, if ya like mellow sounding bass then get flatwound. i use a gauge of 40-95 those a perfect for me, the lighter the strings are the easier it is to play, but you dont get the great tone of the heavy strings, what i did is i bought light, heavy and mediums and i found out the best are light, im into slapping so i currently have the roundwound strings. they still give a great bass tone if your equalization is right. the best way is to experiment, itll cost ya a small amount of cash but if itll help your playing then go for it
     
  5. oh yeah, dont worry about re stringing it. my first time i was worried i would not know what to do, but as i did it it came to me naturally and i did it in no time.
     
  6. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Specifically, bass speakers usaually have enclosed backs. Guitar amps frequently have open backs which do not tend to reinforce low frequencies.

    Also, bass amps are "voiced" for bass -- that is, the tone knobs affect frequencies more useful to basses than to guitars. Guitar amps frequently have bass, mid, and treble at like 100 hz, 1500 hz, and maybe 6000 hz. Bassists need more control around 400 to 1000 hz, and usually like to have a 50 hz knob. That's why you'll see lots more graphic EQs (multiple frequency centers) on bass amps than on guitar amps which more often just have 3 tone knobs (and mybe a 4th one that says "presence" which usually means way up in the stratosphere at 10k or 12k).