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nitrocellulose lacquer

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Jontom, Apr 20, 2002.


  1. Jontom

    Jontom

    Mar 11, 2002
    New York
    I have a bass that I stained with a tung seal finish(appx.3 coats) and followed with a rub-on polyurethane(appx. 6 coats). I have used this bass this way for about 6 mos. The other day I noticed that there were some pick scratches and other abrasions about the body. This didn't sit well. I decided that I would probably end up doing some light sanding and spray on some Stewmacs nitro lacquer. Any drawbacks to using this on a previous polyed surface? And how do I get that super finish on the body like the ones hanging in the guitar megastore?
     
  2. Hmm no idea on the laquer buddy, but something which struck me, and please correct me if i am wrong...

    I think you strike your bass too hard maybe, or have too long a sweep with your pick. When i play, the pick barely moves past say a cm either side of the string i am playing. And its soft too. The pick shouldn't be making scratch marcks on the body of the bass. I saw this on a mates guitar once, large scratches on the body and pick guard and when he played ....:eek:!

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  3. Jontom

    Jontom

    Mar 11, 2002
    New York
    I play in a cover band that does everything from the Ramones to Neil Diamond (www.ptmeatbox.com). The small pick movements would be alright for a tune by the BeeGees, but for the Ramones its balls-out eighth note strumming and Who-inspired windmills,mate...so I need to know if the nitro is going to provide a tougher finish and not crack when its applied over poly. Any takers?
     
  4. I play in a death metal band...... and still use small pick movements.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  5. Jontom

    Jontom

    Mar 11, 2002
    New York
    Helloooo...Nitro...other than the kind you inhale from a balloon...
     
  6. Nitrocellulose lacquer should NEVER be applied over a polyester finish.

    Nitro finishes are extremely thin and need the added bonding that application directly to sealed wood provides. At best all you are going to have is flaking and scratching - but no decent finish. If you want to go nitro, totally strip the instrument and start over. That's the only way it's going to work.
     
  7. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    As usual, Hambone is dead on.

    Furthermore, even if you do completely strip the bass, it isn't going to help your situation.

    Poly never really completely dries. This is the reason it tends to get tacky in high humidity or when it gets sweaty. It is also the reason that it is more commonly used on instruments now than nitro.

    Because it doesn't dry, it is more elastic. It can stand the expansion on contraction of the wood without checking.

    It actually withstands abuse better than nitro. It isn't nearly as likely to chip. Sure it, scratches, but if you played a bass with a nitro finish, as 'Bone mentioned, you would just chip the finish right off in pieces. Even if it was applied directly to the sealed wood.

    If it is that important to you, I suggest a bass with a pickguard.

    As to the other question, in order to get a really good finish, you need a high quality spray gun, but more importantly the experience and knowledge of how to use it.

    Typically with any finishing, whether it be a car, furniture, a guitar or whatever, the deepest, smoothest finishes come from very good prep work before you spray. Followed by many, many ultra-thin coats and the required prep work between them.

    I saw a truck at an auto show not too long ago and the owner/ builder claimed to have sprayed 90 coats of paint on the car. It looked like blue glass.

    Chas
     
  8. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Truth of the matter is,(as Chasarm pointed out) the poly is a more scratch resistant finish than N.C. laquer.

    If you want to use laquer anyway, it should work fine if you apply a barrier coat of vinyl sealer first. You should be able to find vinyl sealer at Stew-Mac.

    I'm still looking forward to someone coming out with a method to use powder coat on wood without having to break the bank for specialized equiptment.

    Pkr2
     
  9. alaskabass

    alaskabass

    Dec 31, 2001
    pkr2,

    Have you looked into, or have any experience, with the powder coating system available from Eastwood auotmotive equipment supply ?

    The last time I checked it was a relatively affordable powder coating set-up. Every time I receive a new catalog from them the powder coat color pallete increases.


    Don
     
  10. They DO have such a system and it will only cost about $200 to have the equipment and powder to do just that. The company you want to get with is called Eastwood. If you're into cars at all, you know about Eastwood - they specialize in auto restoration tools and materials for the home mechanic. They have a complete powder coating system with plenty of colors and you can do it at home with nothing more than an oven as the additional component. Try www.eastwood.com and take a look at what they've got.

    Now, how about taking the whole coating thing a step further. There is a product on the market called LuminOre. It is a sprayable composite metal plating that comes in various types of metal like aluminum, copper, bronze, iron, nickel silver, stainless steel etc. It won't crack, chip, or peel, is impervious to any solvent, can be polished to a mirror finish and once cured has all the characteristics of a cast metal piece including texture, luster and heat conductivity. It is applied using standard HVLP equipment. THAT would make a killer looking body!
     
  11. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    No, Hambone and Don. I wasn't aware that any kind of powder coat system was available for home use.

    I'll do a search when I finish this post though.

    The Luminore thing really sounds interesting.

    Anyone have any idea how hot the oven has to be to use either of these systems?

    It has to be kept in mind that in finishing most bodies, there are glue joints that really don't like a lot of heat.

    Another thing that comes to mind, and I may be wrong in what I think, but doesn't a powder coat system use an electrostatic charge on the part being coated? If so, I wonder how you apply that charge to a nonconductor like a wooden body?

    Does Eastwood recommend thier product for wood?

    I'm going searching and if I turn up anything that sounds usable for our purpose I'll post and let you know.

    Good info! Thanks.

    Pkr2
     
  12. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Hambone, Don and anyone else who might be interested.

    In the interest of not getting off topic any further in this thread, I'm starting a new thread concerning some info I've uncovered on powder coating.

    Pkr2
     
  13. Jontom

    Jontom

    Mar 11, 2002
    New York
    Thanks for all your help in this matter...good thing I waited for some sage advice before taking spray can to bass! All things considered, I think I'll just keep the bass(its my #2 backup) in the shop,sand out the scratches, and continue with more poly coats. I'll save the nitro for my next Warmoth. Can anyone recommend a good rubbing compound for the final buff?
     
  14. A lot of guys use Meguiars polishing compound. Look for it in automotive stores.