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No Treble

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Two-Spirit, Nov 23, 2017.


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  1. Anyone into nothing but bass?
     
  2. Ampslut

    Ampslut

    May 15, 2017
    Back in the 60s when I started playing, that was the popular way for setting things up.
    Edit:. Basses came stock with flat wounds and string mutes trying to sound like an upright. Little by little the mutes went away and the strings got brighter. Now they come stock with round wounds and no mutes. Most cabs come stock with tweeters. Bass guitar has become a full range instrument. I have seen some movement towards a more vintage 60s type sound as of late.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2017
    Korladis, bobyoung53 and Two-Spirit like this.
  3. Tedward

    Tedward Supporting Member

    Feb 15, 2006
    southern california
    Can't beat that old school sound. All my basses have flat wounds, they get the tone I'm after. Amp is an Ampeg SVT-3Pro and two Green Boy 12/6's. The combination works great for the songs we play. I get lots of compliments on my tone. Original blend of county, rock, and blues. I was a teen ager in the sixties and those songs were the biggest influence on me.

    Tedward
     
    bobyoung53 likes this.
  4. GBBSbassist

    GBBSbassist I actually play more guitar... Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2010
    Chicago
    Would you say you're.......all about that bass?
     
  5. TC.65

    TC.65

    Dec 20, 2008
    Carbondale IL
    Ampeg V4BR Bass @ 1-2, Mids @ 12, Treble @ 10-11. Fender PBass with LaBella 760FL's with tone knob at 75-100% = PURE BASS/PURE BLISS!!!
     
  6. For some songs, mainly ballads I eq out some of the high end after the fact in the studio. Just helps give the bass a smoother less aggressive vibe.

    This song is an example


    At shows these days bass is so sub heavy so often I tend to go for more bite and clank than i normally would in the studio.
     
  7. Kind of contradictory since you are self professed "Steve Harris' biggest fan"
     
    lfmn16 and madjazzbass like this.
  8. Rick James

    Rick James

    Feb 24, 2007
    New Jersey
    I've always used a vintage 60s sound: Entwhistle's. 70s too: Stanley's. I think flatwounds were mostly for playing ease, especially during the 60s explosion of electric instruments, when most players were beginners. I know plenty of guitar players who used flatwounds in the 60s, then went to rounds when they cared more about tone. Lots of pros used flats too. Listen to the early Beatles, the sound Harrison got was pure flatwound dullness. I think one of the reasons he used 12 string so much was the sparking highs it got that a six string with flats couldn't deliver. I see more BS about what studio tricks were used to get the sound of the opening chord of 'Hard Days Night'. There weren't any tricks, it was George with his Rick 12. There's at least 4 youtube videos of the Beatles in concert with George hitting that chord, and it sounds exactly like the recording.
    Uprights have plenty of treble. That's the sound Jaco went for with fretless, and he never lacked high end. As for tweeters, they're OK if they run down to at least 2.5 khz, and you don't use them higher than 8 khz. The trouble is that manufactured cabs don't do that, very few run lower than 3.5 khz, most have a low cut off much higher than that.
     
    Korladis likes this.
  9. I don't like rolling off all treble but I've met a lot of people who do. I have an Ampeg BA115. The next thing I'm getting is a PA with a powered sub. I'm going to dial up lows from the pa. I'd like to have a portaflex stack with 2x10 1x15 and a 500 watt head but I don't need anything that big.
     
  10. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    downloadfile-1. Screenshot_20171124-090906. B4c35ZxCcAEVweq.
     
  11. Robroy

    Robroy

    Jun 21, 2006
    Central Kentucky
    Just my opinion: Treble is for slapping and situations where the music needs a percussive sound coming from the bass. I like a bit of midrange to give it a nice, subtle bite and keep it from being too muddy.

    That being said, I notice there are quite a few songs in all genres that seem to keep the bass to almost nothing but really low stuff and anything over 300 hz is a no-no.
     
  12. FirewalZ

    FirewalZ

    Aug 14, 2014
    S.E. Michigan
    If you mean apart from other interests....than I would say yes. The last few years, Ive been in a fairly solid cover band and have really focused alot on my playing and musicianship. I dont watch sports, dont golf, hunt, fix up cars, etc. Outside of work related stuff and kids, its the only other real hobby or passion I have.
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  13. Quickest way to get there if you don't use organ pedals: Any SG-style EB, neck pickup only, and use those red-plastic sheathed flatwounds (OMG, are those still made? They haunted me like Frankenstein's monster back in the 70's . . . .), and believe me, you are 100's of kilometers into the 'No Treble Zone', to never return . . . . . . sounds just like a sub-woofer alone, with no cab for the upper pass.
     
    Lbsterner likes this.
  14. madjazzbass

    madjazzbass Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2014
    Earth
    Right:meh:
     
  15. madjazzbass

    madjazzbass Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2014
    Earth
    I roll off pretty much all the treble on both my amp and Bass (cause I love a Deep, Warm, Punchy tone; unless I'm playing Slap style, then I turn the treble up to about halfway on both. Works for me.
     
    Two-Spirit likes this.
  16. lfmn16

    lfmn16 SUSPENDED Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2011
    charles town, wv
    If you dial off all the treble I think most rigs will sound like a big muddy mess from the audience.
     
  17. Robroy

    Robroy

    Jun 21, 2006
    Central Kentucky
    Yep. That's the reason I feel the need to get at least a little midrange in to give it at least a little bite. You can clean up the mud in a studio recording, but live there can be inherent problems introduced by room acoustics.
     
    Korladis likes this.
  18. knumbskull

    knumbskull

    Jul 28, 2007
    UK
    There are a few times a year when i get a hankering for big dubby bass with very little above 500hz, and nothing else will do.
     
  19. Hounddog409

    Hounddog409

    Oct 27, 2015
    ohio
    Yep. I do not understand why anyone would do that.
     
    Korladis, lfmn16 and MYLOWFREQ like this.
  20. Ukiah Bass

    Ukiah Bass

    May 10, 2006
    DaveDeVille likes this.

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