NPD - birthday pressies

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by reverendrally, Feb 25, 2018.


  1. A mate of mine went off to a tool show today to get me 1 plane...

    IMG20180225160304.jpg

    And came home with 3 for me, plus 3 gouges!

    Stanley #7 and #4 1/2, Falcon (Aussie made) #5.

    He also got me some gouges. All up it's set me back $180. Very stoked. I've got some sharpening to do, but I'm really looking forward to using them. The No.4 I have has been cool for a few things, but not great for book matching tops. Really want to see how the No.7 goes. Was keen for a No.8, but couldn't believe how big the 7 was when I saw it. Should be really good.

    So, all you vintage plane-philes, starting nerding me up on what I should use them all for. :)
     
    rwkeating, Beej, the baint and 5 others like this.
  2. b3e

    b3e

    Sep 5, 2017
    Warsaw, Poland
    A very decent acquisition, congrats! And yes, the N#7 is a big and heavy beast :)
     
  3. saabfender

    saabfender Inactive

    Jan 10, 2018
    Indianapolis
    That was my first thought when I saw your haul. Sound like work to me.
     
  4. the baint

    the baint

    Jan 1, 2010
    Greenville, SC
    Techtronic Industries, North America employee. Opinions are my own.
    Get an extra blade you can highly camber for that #5, so you can use it for removing waste quickly as well as trueing up surfaces with the regular blade. I have a #5 1/2 setup like this and it was a revelation to my woodworking, after attempting everything with my #4.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
    b3e likes this.
  5. Can you explain what you mean by that? I'm a total amateur when it come to planes.
     
  6. the baint

    the baint

    Jan 1, 2010
    Greenville, SC
    Techtronic Industries, North America employee. Opinions are my own.
    I don't have images right now to illustrate, but the idea is that normally on a smoothing blade (like for a #4 or #3) you would have an almost perfectly straight blade edge. Usually you apply a few extra finishing strokes on the each corner to break the corner transition (to prevent leaving tracks with your smoother).

    However, with a jack plane where you want to be able to do a lot of waste removal, you can make a highly cambered blade, which means the edge you present to the workpiece has a radius instead of being perfectly flat. It allows you to scoop into the wood more (less blade makes contact at any one point) for removing lots of material.

    Not only that, but there are tricks with a cambered blade you can you for trying to level out a jointed edge, if you're having trouble truing it up, that can be easier than using a truly straight edged blade.
     
  7. the baint

    the baint

    Jan 1, 2010
    Greenville, SC
    Techtronic Industries, North America employee. Opinions are my own.
    Here is an old image of mine where you can see the second blade with its curved edge:
     
    rwkeating likes this.
  8. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 20, 2021

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