NPD: Dunlop GZR-95 (Geezer Butler Cry Baby Wah)

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by JanusZarate, Mar 22, 2018.


  1. JanusZarate

    JanusZarate Low End Avenger

    Feb 21, 2006
    Boise, ID, USA
    Historically, I'm an on-again, off-again user of wah pedals. I've kept one on my pedalboard about 50% of the time, and have tried quite a few. Usually, I end up offloading my wah pedals because I simply don't gravitate to them in a songwriting or gig setting; they simply don't correspond to the sound in my head.

    I recently decided to plunge back into the world of wah, picking up Geezer Butler's signature Cry Baby: the Dunlop GZR-95. I'm glad I did. It seems to solve a lot of the problems I personally encounter with bass wah pedals:
    • Sounds Great Before Distortion - Most bass wah pedals I've used just don't sound that great in front of distortion. They tend to lack the "thrust" in the mids that I want them to have, and the distortion just subdues them. Even the Bass Crybaby, a personal favorite of mine, doesn't quite cut it. Its funky tones and variable Q don't quite provide the character I want for front-of-chain placement, and it sounds best after distortion. The Geezer Crybaby, however, sounds awesome in front of distortion - and that's where I intend to keep it placed.
    • Auto-Return - It's not a common feature, but it is something I rather love about the Bass Crybaby as well as the Morley Dual Bass Wah. Expecting an auto-return feature has limited my options in terms of wah pedals I actually see myself using live. Thankfully, the Geezer wah has auto-return and an adjustable shutoff delay time.
    • Rock > Funk - The most popular bass wah pedals tend to fall on the "funky" side. The Geezer Crybaby can be funky, but it's not really designed for it. It's mid-forward and tonally tailored for rock and metal, to my ears. You can lower the Q for a broader but more subtle effect, or you can crank the Q for aggressive and focused midrange roar, but it's not going to sound like the Bass Crybaby.
    • Cuts Through with Tone, Not Volume - One of the big issues I had with the Bass Crybaby was that cutting through also meant louder/boomier bass frequencies than I really wanted. The Geezer Crybaby solves this problem by blending in less of your dry signal as you approach the toe-down position, while apparently boosting the mids. Some players might wince at the idea of losing low end at the peak, and many might not care for the resulting tone. But for me, the design makes sense and gives me the midrange tone I'm looking for in a solo context.
    This is the first wah pedal I've ever owned where I didn't have to fight for the tone I wanted. There it was, right out of the box. And if I change my mind later, I can always tweak the Q setting.

    With that said, I recommend that you try this one before you buy, if you can. It's an odd wah, without a doubt... but I'm an odd bassist. :smug:

    P.S. - It works great for Black Sabbath / Heaven and Hell covers too. It's not trying to be like the Tycobrahe Parapedal or an old Crybaby, yet it still feels right at home in the scope of Geezer Butler's sound.
     
    millahh, JimmyM, DosiYanarchy and 5 others like this.
  2. GCPENG

    GCPENG

    Mar 7, 2017
    Ontario, Canada
     
  3. GCPENG

    GCPENG

    Mar 7, 2017
    Ontario, Canada
    A year and a half later …
    Thanks for this. I’ve been unsatisfied with my mini bass wah and you’re tipping me towards this one. More $$$ than a wah should cost, but I don’t have a wah that makes me happy playing Sabbath. My current wags (MBW and a modded 95 Crybaby) just aren’t right. Your review is spot on what I was looking for.
     
    JimmyM likes this.
  4. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    I have one too, and I like it for the same reasons.
     
  5. millahh

    millahh Supporting Member

    Sep 20, 2005
    Jersey
    I somehow missed this in my searching, but it's comforting that I've found it this morning...as I have one arriving this afternoon! What you're describing fits exactly what I was hoping for (and figured that I was getting), but your take addresses a couple of my open concerns nicely, namely about volume and about performance before distortion.
     
    JimmyM likes this.
  6. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    Well since you're getting one, here's my advice for it...experiment with the Q trimpot. I ended up leaving mine all the way up to get max wah out of it. And then I rarely go past halfway with the pedal. That works for me, but you will have to experiment with it to find your own Q comfort zone.

    Also, it sounds a lot more seamless if you adjust the automatic on-off trimpot to off immediately when you're done with it.
     
    GCPENG and millahh like this.
  7. millahh

    millahh Supporting Member

    Sep 20, 2005
    Jersey
    Thanks, I'll give those a try. First impression, I love it with my OCD clone, sounds decent into my B7KU... And nearly disappears in front of my green Russian. I guess when that amount of mids that get killed by the muff, makes sense a mid-centric wah would get lost. But, lots more playing around to do.
     
  8. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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