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NYC Public Transit?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by MadMan118, Aug 10, 2012.


  1. MadMan118

    MadMan118

    Jan 10, 2008
    Vallejo, CA
    An really off the mark topic but I know some of you guys live in the NYC metro area.
    So as i mentioned I'm preparing to finish school/change careers. I'm going into computer science with a focus in software engineering. Those jobs are everywhere. My significant other is a Neurophysiologist, those jobs are in about a handful of major population centers in the world.
    Missoula is a great town if you like mountains, fresh air, and drive trucks. The latter of the bunch Im giving up.
    Needless to say NYC has made it on or list of places we might be relocating to. I looked into housing and other things a bit and I (think) I can handle that stuff. But what hangs me up is the transit system. I know there's not a snowballs chance in **** were keeping both cars in a city like that. So how efficient is it? Whats it going to cost annually? How far will I have to travel to the store, a hospital, what stops am I likely to get stabbed at. Even if I don't end up there in the future it would be nice to know as its something I've always been a bit curious.
     
  2. bombjack

    bombjack

    Feb 3, 2009
    NYC
    NYC is a big place so a lot of it has to do with exactly where you were thinking of living. Manhattan proper? Little to no free street parking so you'll probably have to garage your car(s) if you keep them.

    Outer boroughs - better chance to find a neighborhood that you can park in. Bay Ridge Brooklyn - may as well live in Manhattan as far as street parking. I live in Marine Park and while I can't always find a parking spot right on my block there's usually something within a block or two. Have a brother who lives in Queens and parking isn't really a problem, and another in Staten Island and he does OK too.

    I'm kind of in no man's land where I live as far as trains - about a mile in each direction from 2 different train stations so I take a bus to get to either train station. I unfortunately work in uptown Manhattan so my trip to the city or back home can take anywhere from 1:15 to 2 hours. The buses are slower in the winter during bad weather but the trains are usually OK.

    I used to live in Bay Ridge and had a train just a few blocks walking distance and could get to work in an hour if I caught my first train and then a follow up express train without waiting too long.

    I have a supermarket and a mall just a few blocks walking distance from where I live as well as smaller Deli's, a bagel shop, CVS/RiteAid, etc. so I don't have to drive to pick up quick things. There's a hospital less than a mile from where I am as well. If you head out to the suburbs it's a different story but most neighborhoods have some kind of store just a short drive away if not within walking distance.

    Unlimited METROCARDS cost $104 a month though I heard it's going up again soon...otherwise the fare is $2.25 per ride though you can transfer from train to bus at no charge.

    Some neighborhoods are rougher than others and that of course affects the train stations too. There are some lines I like to avoid but so many of the "bad" neighborhoods are gentrifying and are becoming desirable to live in in all the boroughs.

    I've lived here my whole life so I'm glad to help if you have some neighborhoods in mind!
     
  3. MadMan118

    MadMan118

    Jan 10, 2008
    Vallejo, CA
    Thanks. Yeah its a tentative move for me but a very real possibility for my girlfriend, she really likes the Gramercy park, close to hospitals, and lower east side areas. The areas I like are Park Slope and around there. I went to NYC once as a tourist so i know what it looks like but that's as far as it goes. My #1 concern is safety, I want to be ok knowing that my girlfriend could walk from a station to home and not be bothered. $104 a month is less than the car payments so I'm not sweating that. Can you buy a annual pass or do you have to just get a new one every month?

    Gentrifying is a word that gets tossed around a lot about the city what exactly does that entail?

    Real estate is sky high as expected, but I've lived in the SF bay area and its the same deal there. Except for brokers. Whats up with that? Do I pay them a commission like if I was buying a house?

    Edit: Oh and bikes? Can I take my bike on the subway buses etc? I'm pretty sure there's a million bike shops there.
     
  4. Truktek2

    Truktek2

    Sep 5, 2008
    Queens, NY
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gentrification

    Pretty much boils down to middleclass people moving into areas that were once considered shady, due to being priced out of middleclass neighborhoods. After 9/11 many affluent people got out of NYC and flooded the outer boros because they didn't feel safe in the city anymore. This in turn drove rental properties and home values up, displacing those that could no longer afford to live in those middle class neighborhoods. Red Hook, Williamsburg and LIC are just a few that come to mind. Even former prez Clinton has an office in Harlem now. Who whuda' thunk it?
     
  5. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    I work for nyct (ny city transit).. It is really one of the most efficient transportation systems in the world, when you take into account the scope of the task of moving millions of people 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    A lot of people complain about it (nyers complain about everything) but its a pretty good system for the cost.

    There are two ways to get around, surface transit (bus) or the trains. On the surface there are local buses that that stay within the boros and express buses that service the outer boros from manhattan. Local buses cost 2.25 per ride with a free transfer, while express costs 5.50 with a free transfer also.
     
  6. Truktek2

    Truktek2

    Sep 5, 2008
    Queens, NY
    ^ I've got a couple of friends who are bus mechanics for MTA. I've heard they run a pretty tight ship. You're right they are pretty efficient for such a large outfit.
     
  7. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    What depot?
     
  8. placedesjardins

    placedesjardins

    May 7, 2012
    Depends on where you live and where you need to go. It's quite efficient. You'll find there are connections where you'll need to take a bus, taxi, or just walk it.

    Depends how often you use it. If you go carless, it's not a big deal as you won't have to pay for car loan, registration, insurance, maintenance and repair. If you have a vehicle, parking, tolls, and traffic jams are more of a headache than the cost of the car.

    The subway stations are pretty safe. There are areas in each borough that are more dangerous than others. Knowing where you are and need to go is important and there are places that you don't want to be wandering around at night as your chances of being a victim of a violent crime would be higher.
     
  9. Truktek2

    Truktek2

    Sep 5, 2008
    Queens, NY
    Queens, by Citifield. Roosevelt ave?
     
  10. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    Casey stengal?
     
  11. Truktek2

    Truktek2

    Sep 5, 2008
    Queens, NY
    Nope.
     
  12. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    Huh? Is that a yankee reference, because i don't think thats a name of a depot :confused:
     
  13. Truktek2

    Truktek2

    Sep 5, 2008
    Queens, NY
    Ooops. Ha ha, nope that"s the name of the guy that worked there :)
     
  14. EBodious

    EBodious

    Aug 2, 2006
    Iowa
    i just got back from visiting my mom and sister in brooklyn. they both live in park slope. i gotta say, i am amazed at how different the city seems to me. i left new york in 1990. it felt much cleaner, safer, and friendlier than it used to be. we were in times square at one point. its practically a pedestrian mall now. where did all the porn theatres go? and that new brooklyn bridge park project is very cool.

    the only reason i can think of to have a car is to get away for the weekend. the public transport is great. and, OP, if you do end up in park slope (very expensive) it does seem to be safe for women. obviously, i can't tell you your gf will be fine, but the culture there seems to suggest that women feel safe.

    my best story from the trip that i am telling folks here in central iowa:

    i visited with an old friend who just moved over to cobble hill (very nice and expensive). they looked to buy first but could not swing it. however, they looked at one place and the realtor told them they had the option of buying a parking space in the little lot next to the building. the price of the space is... $50,000.

    like i said, the public transportation in nyc is great.
     
  15. MadMan118

    MadMan118

    Jan 10, 2008
    Vallejo, CA
     
  16. bombjack

    bombjack

    Feb 3, 2009
    NYC
    You can link a new metrocard to a credit card so that the card gets renewed every month.

    If you've lived in SF then you do know what Manhattan prices are like...things are slightly less expensive in the boroughs.

    If you use a broker to find an apt then you typically pay them 1 months rent as their fee but that can vary as well.

    People bring bikes on the subway all the time but there's no room for them on the buses. I don't think I've ever seen a bus equipped with a bike rack on it like I've seen in other cities but maybe the guys here who work for or know MTA who have posted can answer that question for you?
     
  17. EBodious

    EBodious

    Aug 2, 2006
    Iowa
    my friends didn't opt for the $50K spot, but still own a car (for weekend trips). they park on the street, which is fine. however, each tuesday and thursday morning one of them sits in their car for 1.5 hrs waiting for the street sweeper to come thru. then they re-park their car. they consider it worth it. compared to 50 grand, maybe they are right. but convoluted stuff like that is on the list of reasons i don't wish to live there.

    best of luck in your move!
     
  18. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    typically you aren't supposed to bring a bike onto a city bus, but depending on the time (not rush hour) and the driver (nyc bus drivers can be VERY salty) you might get away with it..

    You also want to get accustomed to the new "select" bus service. You pay at an atm type machine outside the bus and keep the receipt. Then you just walk on the bus.. Its a really speedy service..
     
  19. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    Lmao.. Casey Stengal is the name of the depot near citi field..
     
  20. MadMan118

    MadMan118

    Jan 10, 2008
    Vallejo, CA
    So is sounds like the transit system is pretty solid. I really do not want to bring a car into Manhattan. I've driven a truck down there and it was a nightmare. My girlfriend has some really good offers there. If I were to move no way in heck am I shipping furniture cross country. So how am I going to get large pieces of furniture across town without a car of the place doesn't offer delivery?
     

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