Nylon Tapewounds

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Moondog, Feb 24, 2001.

  1. Does anyone have any experience with black nylon tapewounds? Any information would be a great help, including comparisons to flatwounds and differences between brands.
  2. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    The only ones I've tried are La Bella 760N's. They are nice, bassy strings with a brightness that flats generally don't have. Even though they're really fat, they felt kind of loose to me, especially compared to something like Fender 9050L flatwounds. So if you pluck hard, you may get plenty of fret rattle. I didn't like them enough to keep them on, though, I have TI Flats on one bass and DR Lo-Riders on another. My fretless is going to get Fender flats when I put it back together. The tapes will give you a nice mwah on fretless.
  3. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    I love my Labella tapewounds, which I bought from Carvin for cheap. I have them on my 4- and 5-string fretlesses, and they sound great. They do seem to have a little more high end than flats. I took a broken one apart, and they are roundwound under the nylon. I've never tried them on fretted. They also last a long time.
  4. SuperDuck


    Sep 26, 2000
    Give them Nylon Tapewounds a try, you'll love them. I play on a fretless, and for a long time I was hooked on flatwounds. Then I went into an experimental phase and put on some Bass boomers roundwounds (shudder... never again...) and then ended up with Fender Nylon Tapewounds. They take a little getting used to, in terms of feel, but that's natural when switching types of strings. The tone is great; like Monkey said, they have a flatwound sound, just with more high end. The Fenders are the only brand I've played, but now that I know I love them (see my signature, it used to say "flatwounds") I'll look into some other brands when my Fenders die. That should take a while, though, from what I've heard. They give you a rather unique tone, and I highly recommend you give them a shot. And, as a bonus, they look pretty cool, too.
  5. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    It's been years, but I used a brand named Picato. They're British and I used them when anything British = cool in the US.

    Also, used Fenders.

    Didn't find much different in tone between the two. They certainly are kind to the fingers and frets, fingerboard.

    They sound as dark as they look. But that's what I wanted. I'd call it a "vintage" tone, like when bass amps weren't designed to achieve cutting treble, like a fliptop Ampeg B-15. They are very warm, none of that metallic, "coldness" of steels.