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Obscure original versions which were as good if not better than hit cover versions

Discussion in 'Bass Humor & Gig Stories [BG]' started by bobyoung53, Nov 10, 2016.


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  1. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    The original version of "Keep On Running" was written and recorded by Jackie Edwards in 1965. The Spencer Davis Group covered it in 1965 for a #1 U.K. hit and it was a hit in several other countries as well.



     
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  2. Holdsg

    Holdsg I should be practicing Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 10, 2009
    Alta Loma, CA
    love the groove in Keep on Running
     
    Flooflox likes this.
  3. fretter

    fretter

    May 24, 2012
    PA


     
  4. LUpton

    LUpton Supporting Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    Tampa, FL
    Probably too old for this sh--
    BJ Thomas did a version of that song in 1966, too:

     
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  5. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    "It's Just a Matter of Time" was co-written and first recorded by Brook Benton for an R&B and Pop hit in 1959. The song later found a second life as a country song, with major hit recordings by three different country music performers - Sonny James (1970); Glen Campbell (1985); and Randy Travis (1989).







     
  6. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    "Going to a Go-Go" was originally recorded by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles in 1965 for a million selling hit. The Rolling Stones covered it for an international hit in 1982.



     
  7. dadglasser

    dadglasser

    Oct 11, 2009
    Steve Goodman's Door Number Three:



    I have no idea whether he had to pay royalties to Bob Dylan for that bit toward the end. Covered by Jimmy Buffett:

     
  8. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    "Saving All My Love for You" was originally recorded for a minor hit by Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis, Jr. in 1978. The song became an international hit for Whitney Houston in 1985.



     
  9. Holdsg

    Holdsg I should be practicing Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 10, 2009
    Alta Loma, CA
    There was this cat named Richard Strauss that penned a masterpiece for orchestra and pipe organ in 1896.



    A few years later, an brazillian genius named Eumir Deodato got some studio cats (like, oh Ron Carter, Stanley Clarke, and Billy Cobham) together and make this fantastic "cover". part of the soundtrack of my youth.

     
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  10. Many years ago I explored the idea of performing Holst’s The Planets suite with rock instrumentation. I was probably inspired by ELP’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Never followed through, though. Too bad.
     
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  11. Holdsg

    Holdsg I should be practicing Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 10, 2009
    Alta Loma, CA
    Yeah. Especially Mars. I think Trans Siberian Orchestra does a version of Mars.

    Did you ever hear Isao Tomita’s (synth) version of The Planets?
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  12. I haven’t but I’ll check it out. Fifty years on down the road I still rank the Angel Records release with Sir Adrian Boult conducting the New Philharmonia Orchestra as my favorite. (Angel S36420) My bunky at my first college was a music major and we’d debate heatedly about which version [of anything] was better and who conducted better. We both came out winners in those challenges.
     
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  13. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    "The River Is Wide" was first recorded by The Forum in 1967 and after a couple different version releases, made it to #45 on the U.S. chart in 1968. Bobby Rydell covered it next in 1968 for a single on the Reprise Record label but it did not chart. The Grass Roots covered it and released their single version in 1969 for a Top 40 hit.







     
  14. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    And, yet, another song that The Grass Roots had a hit with that was originally done by somebody else. "Lovin' Things" was first done in in 1967 by the song's co-writer Artie Schroeck that was not released as a single.
    Bobby Rydell then covered it in 1967 and put it out as a single that went nowhere. In 1968, the Scottish band The Marmalade had a a Top 10 U.K. hit with it but it was not released as a single in North America. Ken Mansfield Orchestra did it in 1968. U.S. act December's Children also did it in 1968. Jackie Trent & Tony Hatch recorded it in 1968. The Grass Roots released their version in February 1969 and had a Top 40 U.S. and Canadian hit with it. Petula Clark recorded it in 6 different languages and The Ventures did an instrumental cover it in 1969 as album tracks. Pia Zadora did it in 1982 for a single that did not chart.



















     
  15. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    Tesla did a cover song called "Little Suzi" in 1987 which was originally done by British group Ph.D as "Little Suzi's on the Up" in 1981. The Ph.D version did not do anything. The Tesla rendition was a U.S. rock chart hit and has been a mainstay song in their live shows.



     
  16. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town was written by Mel Tillis and first recorded by Waylon Jennings in 1966. Johnny Darrell had a Top 10 country hit with it in 1967 Kenny Rogers and The First Edition had an international hit in 1969. It was covered by many other acts.











     
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