Odd 70's Fender, questions...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jenderfazz, May 14, 2004.

  1. Went to the music shop today and saw what appeared to be a 76 Fender. It had the tick black Jazz logo, a 76+5 digit serial number, made in USA, white binding and block inlays on a maple board, etc. It also had the 3 bolt neck plate - however, on the plate was written "Fender Japan" which got me wondering. The neck seems to be an authentic 76 Jazz neck, but the body is likely from some reissue or possibly a standard Japanese 80's model (I'll be looking that up right now)? It's a natural body with white pickguard, by the way. Pickups seem old, pickup cover is very used up. Bridge volume knob is loose. However, a very playable bass. I didn't get to plug it in or get more info, but I will sometime soon. My questions:

    As above, could the body and neck be from different places? Do 80's Japanese Jazz basses have the 3 bolt neck plate (and I don't mean on their reissues)? How much should it go for, being a mix of basses or whatnot?

    If it's cheap (say under 600 CDN) I may want to look it up. Would make a nice project bass, I could drop some new pickups or something. Thanks.
  2. It could be one of the MIJ 75 Jazz re-issues that were available in the late 90's.
  3. Offbase


    Mar 9, 2000
    There's a lot of possibilities there, among them.

    1. A 90's-2000's MIJ 75 RI fraudulently altered with a 70's
    serial number?

    2. A genuine 70's J with a replaced, MIJ neckplate?

    3. A 70's J neck put on a reissue?

    To see if the neck is legit, ask to take the neck off and look at the butt for telltale markings. A way to do it without taking off the neck is to look at the inlays. The 70's ones looked much more like real MOP (for all I know, might've BEEN real - they looked pretty good). By comparison, the MIJ 75 RI neck inlays are obviously simulated MOP - much less transluscent, less refractive, almost plastic looking.

    One thing IS clear: If they're selling it as an original 70's J, or claim not to know, RUN out of that store!
  4. Well, the inlays seem very real. There's a little crack in the first fret one, which I heard is common for old inlaid basses. Is that a problem, anyway?

    Another thing, the bridge saddles have one groove for the string to rest on, while my American Fender has many grooves to make sure the string is between the pole pieces. Did 70's Fenders have those bridges?
  5. Any Frakenfender is worth no more than $500.00 USD


    Yes, there were two bridges, as shown below. The "single groove" is the original, the 'many grooves" bridge is after market and made for reissue use!



  6. OK, I got info on that bass. The guy selling it had a Japanese Reissue and an American 76 Jazz, and so he kept the Japanese neck and the American body, pickups, etc. The others, he turned into this bass and brought it in. Played nice, but the guy wants 900$ for it. The shop owner says the price is basically for the original neck. I guess that's out of the question.
  7. JayAmel

    JayAmel Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2002
    Aurillac, France
    Yeah, way too expensive, IMO. For that price you can almost get a brand new MIA Jazz ($969.99 at MF).