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oil finish article...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by JSPguitars, Jul 19, 2004.


  1. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Anyone have a quick link to that "Oil finish" article that kept popping up here a few months ago. It was in regards to Danish oil, I believe. I have the link saved on my computer at home, but I'm at the paretals house and using Dad's computer today.
    Started to oil finish my bass this weekend...
    I used that Minwax "hardwood conditioner" or whatever it's called (heard about from Hambone) to strengthen the headstock since it's kinda thin. That stuff is pretty cool. You could almost use that stuff as a finish for a bass. I'm kinda scared of the chemicals it's made of though, makes you wonder. I also used it on the fingerboard, since I'm making a fretless (good idea or no??) Seems to be working out okay. I began staining the body with Danish oil, but have come to find that after 2-3 coats, I'm still seeing some areas of the body that look "dusty" or "unfinished".......I attribute this again to 'User sanding error'. Hopefully I can sand in some Oil once it gets drier and these areas might disappear. I'm also thinking I shoulda used Tru-oil. Hmmmmmmmm......
    Anyway, thought reading that danish oil article, if someone has it (i searched, couldn't dig it up) might help out a bit.
    THx,
    jeff
     
  2. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
  3. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    thx pilot!
     
  4. Bass Kahuna

    Bass Kahuna

    Dec 3, 2002
    West Lafayette, Indiana
    Luthier, Custom Builder
    One thing to keep in mind with that method is that if you have a very light wood (ie: maple) next to a dark wood (ie: macassar ebony or black limba, etc.) the "slurry of oil and wood dust" you create in the first few steps can get in the pores of the woods and create a slightly undesireable result, dark wood dust in the pores of the light wood.

    I sent an email to the author of the article, and he kinda agreed that it could be a slight problem, and advised if using VERY different colored woods to not sand the first coat or two of the oil to seal up the pores a bit.

    Otherwise, it is a great article and a very useful and insightful method of oil finishing!

    :^)~
     
  5. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    great article. I'm oil finishing a figured walnut bass right now and am going to try this method.
     
  6. Bass Kahuna

    Bass Kahuna

    Dec 3, 2002
    West Lafayette, Indiana
    Luthier, Custom Builder
    fwiw... I was never really completely happy with the results I used to get from Oil Finishes, and after seeing this article myself a few months ago I started using a slightly modified version of his method (after the email conversation we had regarding light and dark woods in combination...) in that I don't wet sand the first few coats in as he recommended. I use the polymerized tung oil sealer (from Lee Valley) for the first two coats and REALLY let it soak in.

    Then I start putting on the polymerized tung oil, and I do wet sand those following coats in, with 600 grit, and then do use the Watco Satin Finish wax and wet sand it in with 1200 - 1500 grit and it does work great!

    :^)~
     
  7. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Hambone!

    This article should definitely be incorporated in the Tips and Tricks sticky!

    Preferably copied (if the author accepts) due to ordinary Internet insecurity, like server breakdowns, ISP belly-up, etc.
     
  8. Scottgun

    Scottgun

    Jan 24, 2004
    Virginia
    Wow! I just saw that article for the first time today and coincidently there is this thread.

    Anyway, he mentions how the "once a day for a week, once a week for a month", etc. is extreme but I was wondering. I am thinking of building a bass over a long period of time (2 years?). Is it worthwhile to adhere to that adage or is it overkill with no appreciable advantages? If not, how would the instructions vary?



    Scott
     
  9. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I remember finding this article, and it really has some great tips. To answer scottgun, you can do that, and the wood will usually penetrate more and more. The more you oil (properly) the better it seems to get. Like an old rifle stock, keeping it properly oiled keeps it looking beautiful, and protects the wood.
     
  10. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    I am using this method on a j body that I made and so far (i've wet sanded with 400) the sheen is not yet there. this bod has a flamed walnut top. I'm hoping that after the 600 wet i start to see some results or else I'm going to let it dry and shoot it with nitro lacquer.
     
  11. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    I'm at the satin wax stage of my bass and I think it looks pretty dang good, but then I don't really know what the hell I'm doing, yet. Plus my body is just plain 'ol mahogany. You definitely have to let the different stages dry before putting on/wetsanding in the next coat! I hate this patience thing when I dont have another project to work on here at my house.
    I'll post some pics when I get the bridge and tuners on it. Can't wait to try and file (bust) that nut! Never tried to set up a fretless before :p