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Olivs

Discussion in 'Strings [DB]' started by JAS, Mar 28, 2002.


  1. JAS

    JAS

    Jul 3, 2001
    California
    Has anyone here tryed the pirastro olivs? i tryed a cello the other day with a oliv C string. wow! so easy to play and so much sound. I have never tryed gut strings before, but it sounded amazing on the low cello string. i would love to hear some experiences with these strings. i have been using corellis and i have been pretty satisfied with them. Has anyone tried the Euduxa either? what is the difference between the olivs and the euduxa strings?
     
  2. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    There are people here using them that will probably reply. Specifically some folks are using Olivs on G & D and Eudoxas on A & E. Eudoxas have more metal and less gut than the Olivs and therefore the sound is not as dark but the sustain is longer. Apparently the Oliv A & E are not very suitable for pizz - no sustain at all.

    I'm using Velvet Animas which are also metal-wound gut and I'm very happy with them.

    Adrian
     
  3. JAS

    JAS

    Jul 3, 2001
    California
    So for jazz and for arco, Eudoxas are the ones that most people use?
     
  4. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Not necessarily/I'm not sure which is more popular for jazz. It depends on the sound you want. The reason some people use the Oliv/Eudoxa combo is that the Olivs have THE gut sound that people want but they just don't have enough sustain for pizzicato on the bottom two strings.

    I haven't tried the Pirastro guts but I find the Velvet Animas to be great for jazz and are OK for arco. Some folks here who used to use the Animas have switched to the Oliv/Eudoxa combo and I believe in comparison, the Pirastros have less sustain, and the gauge is a little thinner, but they bow much easier.

    Adrian
     
  5. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    So if you like the Olivs so much on the G and D, wouldn't it make sense to try the Eudoxas on the A and E?

    Adrian
     
  6. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    That's the mix that David K. uses now.
    He played for some time on a full Oliv set, then switched to Garbos (I think) for a short while, and then the Oliv + Eudoxa mixed set. (correct, David?) :)
     
  7. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Well yes that's my point. Actually Dave used Animas before going to the Oliv and Eudoxa combo. Monte is also using them.

    Adrian
     
  8. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Yeah, I'm using them and loving them. Olivs on the D & G, Eudoxa on the E & A. I get a huge sound both pizz and arco. When we were rehearsing in orchestra, my teacher thought I had a rattle. Upon investigating, I was rattling a celllist's Manhassett stand with a loose screw from ~ 15' away.

    I've heard all the stuff about tuning difficulties, and after 2 weeks with them on it got where they would stay close to in tune (the first two weeks would vary wildly), and after a month they stayed in tune as well as the Spiros I used to use. I leave the bass in my humidified room, go to my gig and leave the bass out of its case for about 15 minutes, tune and then play. We play for 4 hours, and the first set is an hour and a half. I retune after that (it usually isn't far off, and I pizz pretty hard), and I rarely need to retune for the third set.

    Monte
     
  9. JAS

    JAS

    Jul 3, 2001
    California
    why doesn't any one use all Eudoxa on all 4 strings?
     
  10. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    I know for some people it's simply because the Eudoxas especially on the G and D, don't have the sound people are looking for. Everything is a tradeoff.

    Adrian
     
  11. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    I only tried a full set of Eudoxa's once, but the G string was not as "meaty" as the Oliv. The Oliv has the fattest sound on that string I've ever heard. Everything else sounds mushy to me by comparison.

    Monte
     
  12. The Olivs have a super-fat sound, a lot of punch and bottom. Soundwise, the Oliv/Eudoxa combo I use reminds me a lot of the traditional gut set-up with plain gut G and D and wrapped A and E, but they don't have all of the maintence hassles and difficult playability.
     
  13. David,

    What are the string diameters? Is the G as thick as an Obligato?

    Mark
     
  14. I don't know the diameters offhand, but you definitely need wider grooves than you would for Obligato.
     
  15. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    The Oliv G is slightly thicker than my original Flatchrome D string. The Oliv D is similar to a steel A string.

    HTH.
     
  16. JAS

    JAS

    Jul 3, 2001
    California
    Are there any gut strings that are a lighter gage than these? So gut strings are thincker, but have less tension and are more boyent than steel strings. They are easier to play? can they be amplified with an underwood pickup and still have a warm soft sound?
     
  17. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    I'm not 100% sure, but I think the thinnest would be the Eudoxas in thin gauge.
    You can use a piezo pickup with them.
    I personally think that gut strings can have a slight nasal quality but that's another story... :)
     
  18. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    For arco I could definitely agree that some gut strings sound nasal but definitely not for pizz. The Animas I am using for example have a much bigger and warmer pizz sound than any steel string I have played. Arco however is pretty nasal.

    Gut strings are easier for pizz with the lower tension. Most people find that the arco is harder though - you have to coax the sound out and be very careful not to use too much bow pressure. Starting notes in particular is harder because of the lower tension. I think the gauge is a personal thing.

    If you're not used to the thicker strings, they can be a bit unwieldy to begin with but I personally find the larger gauge much nicer under the fingers. I'd rather have that than the thinner gauge digging into my fingertips. The one drawback I've found is that the larger gauge does eat into the fingerboard a lot quicker.

    I don't know anything about Underwood usage except to say that most of the guts strings sold nowadays are wound with metal even though the core is gut. You can however still get unwound gut strings at least on G & D.
     
  19. Neither of these statements even remotely apply to Olivs or Eudoxas
     
  20. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    And that I believe is one of the reasons you are no longer using the Animas.

    Adrian