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Ominus noise from my Dodge Dakota!

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Stinsok, Oct 9, 2013.


  1. Stinsok

    Stinsok Supporting Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Central Alabama
    Sounds like a mud grip tire singing. Gets higher as speed increases. The sound is interrupted when you turn the wheel to the left (at 30mph or higher.) I was thinking it may be a bad wheel bearing. I jacked it up and spun the tires manually but there was not grinding, etc.
     
  2. slobake

    slobake resident ... something Supporting Member

  3. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    ominous

    I saw the thread title and started reading Oh... Minus... ? :confused:
     
  4. Stinsok

    Stinsok Supporting Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Central Alabama
    Yes, I missed the "o." There was a reply before I could fix it.
     
  5. Probably a wheel bearing. You won't necessarily hear or feel it when turning the wheels manually.

    Those things can get incredibly loud!
     
  6. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    does it still make the noise when coasting at speed down the road?
     
  7. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    All replies are invalid until Mike N. drops his knowledge on us. :D

    -Mike
     
  8. NWB

    NWB

    Apr 30, 2008
    Kirkland, WA
    I agree that it's most likely a wheel bearing.

    If not, then demonic posession is my next guess.
     
  9. Stinsok

    Stinsok Supporting Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Central Alabama
    It makes the noise when coasting (in gear or in neutral.)


     
  10. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    long ago, that was how we'd check to make sure it wasn't engine-related: coast at speed and rev the engine. if the noise stays the same, it's downstream...most likely a wheel bearing, possibly an axle bearing, some trucks have a driveshaft bearing, u-joint, etc.
     
  11. NWB

    NWB

    Apr 30, 2008
    Kirkland, WA
    Demonic possession for sure.
     
  12. dieselbass

    dieselbass

    May 15, 2010
    Davis CA
    I say differential.
     
  13. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Its a wheel bearing, if it gets quieter when turning left its most likely on the left side, as the outside tire spins faster than the inside tires when turning..
     
  14. dieselbass

    dieselbass

    May 15, 2010
    Davis CA
    spinning the tires won't tell you much. Axial play would indicate wheel bearing. Drive it a short distance and see if one hub is warmer than the other. This would confirm the bearing theory and tell you which side.
     
  15. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    Spencerport, New York
    Thanks. :)

    Wheel bearing is the issue.
     
  16. NWB

    NWB

    Apr 30, 2008
    Kirkland, WA
    Are you sure it's not demonic possession?

    I've heard that's a common problem with Dakotas.
     
  17. fhm555

    fhm555 So FOS my eyes are brown Supporting Member

    Feb 16, 2011
    No expert, but if I hear a high pitched whine that is not coming from the engine I look for a bad tire or bad wheel bearing.
     
  18. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    mike n has spoken.

    thanks for playing!
     
  19. buzzbass

    buzzbass Shoo Shoo Retarded Flu !

    Apr 23, 2003
    NJ
    if it is a wheel bearing, which it sounds like is the case, you cannot by just the bearings. You'll need a whole hub assembly. Rock Auto has them for a pretty decent price. Make sure to find out whether your truck has 4w or 2w abs, as I believe the hubs are different for each.
     
  20. Stinsok

    Stinsok Supporting Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Central Alabama
    Do new hubs come "packed," or do they need packing?
     

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