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one piece flatsawn Hard Maple neck

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Mar 4, 2006.


  1. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I know it was the standard Fender way but I have always perfered to laminate. Any body else do the one piece ones? I do have 1 board I could do it with......t
     
  2. VaantCustom

    VaantCustom

    Feb 5, 2006
    Canada
    The 1 piece flatsawn neck and the scoop headstock are done for 1 reason. Cost. It's simply easier and cheaper to do it that way; not at all better.

    And when the neck warps, you simply unscrew it and bolt on a new one!

    So to a person putting in the time and effort to create a handmade, high quality instrument, I say laminate!
     
  3. Matt R

    Matt R Supporting Member

    Jun 5, 2007
    Newbury Park, Ca.
    Laminate necks are more stable however it is IMHO that one piece maple necks sound best. The one piece necks sound uncompressed to me, are strong in overtones as they are in fundamental. As where laminate necks have a strong fundamental but are limited in overtones and some what compressed sounding. The one piece necks are cheaper to build only if one has the proper jigs to rout the curved truss rod slot properly. Otherwise they are almost impossible to make at a reasonable price from what I understand.
     
  4. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Zombie thread :bag: I do more 1 piece maple necks now that laminated...
     
  5. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I am sorry I may have mis-spoke I do have a separate finger/fretboard. By 1 piece neck I meant a 1 piece neck with a fretboard not a laminated neck then a fretboard...t
     
  6. A single piece of flatsawn will not be as strong or stable as it would be laminated especially with the grain turned 90degrees to be effectively the same as quartersawn
     
  7. allexcosta

    allexcosta Banned

    Apr 7, 2004
    Boca Raton - FL
    Endorsing Artist: MLaghus Custom Basses
    Why?
     
  8. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    Swing and a miss.
     
  9. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Just re looked at the thread title and noticed it mentioned flatsawn. Almost all mine are 1/4 sawn.
     
  10. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    I use flatsawn for builds of a Fender style or BC Rich style necks. You just cannot beat the look of clean, clear, and sexy Maple!
     
  11. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Currently making one for an old strat, that's been lying around.... but that one will have a 5/16" aluminum fingerboard, 2 way trussrod and 2 cf rods... should be stable enough after that..,.........gotta get more shop time though.......too much going on...
     
  12. Well this is not true.
    Being wood an anisotopic material, some have its highest elasticity module in grain direction and others 90 degrees.
    As far as I know maple is more rigid when flatsawn, and sapelli (for example) stronger when quartersawn...

    About stability nothing to say, quartersawn lumber remains dimensionally more stable than flatsawn pieces...

    Being scarce has nothing to do with hardness, many of the confusion comes from this bias.
    IMHO:bag:
     
  13. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    George Romero haunts the LC :p
     
  14. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Must...eat...BRAINS

    ;)
     
  15. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Don't lose your head :D. That works for Highlander too...LMAO
     
  16. I'm not an instrument builder but I am an accomplished woodworker and it's commonly accepted that laminated wood is stronger and more stable,especially when turning flatsawn wood on edge to make it 1/4 sawn.
    If I'm wrong about maple,could someone elaborate a little,I find it hard to believe that a solid piece of flatsawn anything is stronger than laminated.In fact,I used both lam-beams and LVL beams in my home,both beams laminated all in one direction for strength(altho certainly not maple LOL)
    Am I wrong that solid wood will be much more likely to twist or warp too?
     
  17. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    it's necessary to look at the end grain of the board, to identify which cut it is. Some Rift-sawn and some Quarter-sawn can look the same on the face side of the board, but they are not the same. True quartersawn wood is cut at a different angle than flatsawn or riftsawn.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Well I´m just an amateur bass builder and woodworker.
    Been working for some time in a classical guitar shop.
    I have found many reports of maple being harder flatsawn, a couple of violin makers, and an interview to Roger Sadowsky unfortunately dont remember where I read it.
    Anyway, argue about this doesn't make any sense, the way of prove it is easy, cut two equal samples and in controlled environment apply force, in one and 90 degrees in other .
    drum roll....
    :)

    I´m a big enthusiast of quartersawn wood, I have used quartersawn maple in my first build and in two new builds currently in progress, my belief is that it will remain more stable when moisture changes...

    There are some concepts that usually found mixed in a random way, which can lead to confusion:
    Strength
    Stiffness
    Dimensional stability(and its subtypes)
    Hardness
    Etc...

    You know, Lignumvitae, and Goncalo Alvez are really hard ones but they move as a f**k, also some experience with north spain oak, this is a stiff wood but it really warps in hours, again straight, then twist, looks more snake than a piece of wood!

    About laminated wood yes, multiple laminates makes the whole piece more isotropic therefore more dimensionally stable than a single piece...
    BTW titebond is harder than wood but stiffer?

    Just my humble opinion and as you know opinions are like ass, everybody has one:D
     
  19. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    Saying that flatsawn lumber is weaker is like saying you won't swim in the ocean because someone peed in it.

    All wood can and will warp if not dried/selected properly.

    The strength of LVL is in the glue.
     
  20. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    Stability and stiffness are separate issues.

    There is a conventional wisdom that says quarter sawn is stiffer than flat sawn. There are many who hold that belief (at one time I was in that crowd) but it seems like those who have done their own experimentation generally find that it is not true. I don't have a link but I believe Rick Turner and Frank Ford have done the tests and concluded flatsawn may be marginally stiffer and that's good enough for me.

    If the wood is well seasoned and done moving then flat sawn versus quarter sawn is not a big deal. If movement is a possibility, then the type of movement that is typical of a quartersawn neck is preferable to that of flat sawn.