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One year Jeff berlin inspired routine

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Langueta, May 3, 2010.


  1. Langueta

    Langueta Guest

    Jul 9, 2007
    Hi I am intermediate bass player. I want to progress.
    I have this routine inspired by the posts of Jeff berlin and his advices.
    It focus on Reading, Ear training, Jazz type studies, phrases for Jazz improvisation, chord tones and its inversions.

    Reading
    1-Simandl sight reading book- Studies for reading in every key
    2-Reading of intervals from J. Des Press book will help also with Ear training as I read them also without my bass
    3-Des pres:Set of Exercises of pitch and rhithm in other positions. and same exercises in 12 keys.
    4-Standing in the shadows of mo..learn some tunes in different keys, what tones he uses over each chord??

    Jazz type studies and chord tones
    1-Jeff Berlin - A Comprehensive Chord Tone System for Mastering the Bass, make the exercisises in 2-5-1 progression with the inversions.
    2-Add tensions to the chord tones with the same exercises. Learn wich tension belongs to each substitute chords.
    3-Berlin exercise of playing chord tones over standards. Surrounding the chords with the near chord tones.
    4-Walking ray brown book.

    Phrases for Jazz improvisation
    1-I have 10 phrases over chord tones and tensions, play them in every key.
    2-Transcribe some phrases of standards and transpose to every key. 10 more or less

    Imagine you teach this for a music school during one year program.

    How would you organize it, wich things would you teach first?
     
  2. Langueta

    Langueta Guest

    Jul 9, 2007
    I think I will begin with the fundamentals

    1-Jeff Berlin - A Comprehensive Chord Tone System for Mastering the Bass, make the exercisises in 2-5-1 progression with the inversions. (without memorizing). Go through all the book. Play inversions with open strings.
    2-Reading of intervals from J. Des Pres simplified sight reading book, will help also with Ear training as I read them also without my bass
    3-Simplified sight reading by J.Des pres:Set of Exercises of pitch and rhithm in other positions. and same exercises in 12 keys.
    4-Simandl sight reading book- Studies for reading in every key

    After...
    1-Add tensions to the chord tones with the same exercises. Learn wich tension belongs to each substitute chords.
    2-Berlin exercise of playing chord tones over standards. Surrounding the chords with the near chord tones.
    3--Walking ray brown book.

    After..
    Phrases for Jazz improvisation
    1-I have 10 phrases over chord tones and tensions, play them in every key.
    2-Transcribe some phrases of standards and transpose to every key. 10 more or less
    3-Standing in the shadows of mo..learn some tunes in different keys, what tones he uses over each chord??
     
  3. Chrispurchase

    Chrispurchase

    Oct 24, 2007
    Hi, can you let me know what books these are?
     
  4. Langueta

    Langueta Guest

    Jul 9, 2007
  5. Hi! I have to revive this thread. I'm glad I found this. I direct this question to Langueta or any other TBer that has possibly followed a similar routine and could provide some input? Langueta, how has this routine been for you? how have you changed it since you made this thread? would you make any additional suggestions? ???...by the way, i do have a copy of the Jeff Berlin Chord Studies book, and plan on looking into the other books you suggested....I'm an intermediate player, no sight reading ability, with a minimal background in theory (I'm familiar with the diatonic scale, circle of fifths, 7th chords...MINIMAL as you can tell)
    If you prefer email: sailorofcheese@ymail.com
    thanks
     
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Best of luck, his last post was from 2010 and his last activity (like signing in and viewing threads) was in May of 2012.

    You might have better luck seeing if you can e-mail him/her through TB.
     
  7. Yeah. I found the Jeff Berlin chord systems in pdf awhile back. thanks. unfortunately, him/her hasn't enabled that personal email option....thank you though...
     
  8. Lownote38

    Lownote38

    Aug 8, 2013
    Nashville, TN
    I think Jeff's system of learning is to work on all of those things while practicing. He is on Facebook. You can find him there if you need to ask him a question about it.
     
  9. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    A lot of this material is foundation based to each other.
    For example any sight-reading will help you understand intervals, as will playing chord tone studies as advocatted by Jeff.
    In playing chord tones you hear intervals, so in-effect ear training.
    This will lead to substitutions because you need to know what you are substituting first in order to know what to substitute it with.
    This will lead to more chords tones.
    Transcribing will teach you to write it, so that means being able to read it.....so you are back full circle to sight reading.....and so it goes.

    So long as the information you use is viable and music based, then it does not matter what source you learn to read from, so long as you learn to read, or what you transcribe, so long as you learn to transcribe, or how you learn to play and perform.....just so long as you learn to do it.;)

    Yes there is a natural order in learning material and not really the information that is in question, but how it is taught.
    I am from the school that teaches scales and scale construction first and foremost, then hang Triads, Arpeggios and Chord Extensions off of that.
    Then it is how Rhythm, harmony and melody works works and you are off and running. All this is done using sight reading and playing using SN so that relationships develops as well, so that means transcription skills develop, so interval skills develop.
    Again, one thing supports the other and it leaves no gaps or guess work, it allows you to work out ideas either in your head, on paper, or on the instrument, so its a cross purpose learning and understanding.
    This is the same as Jeff idea, but presented different, but leading to the same thing....a musician. :)
     
  10. Thank you Fergie for you input. I just picked up some books that will help me with reading (intervals, rhythm/tempo notation) along with the Jeff Berlin Chord system book, for harmony. I'll start transcribing as well.
     
  11. GastonD

    GastonD

    Nov 18, 2013
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Fergie has already provided a good answer/insight, and here's just my two cents.

    I also have a strong affinity to basing my practice on the chord tones as the foundation. Besides using them in the above mentioned ways, I also like to work on my arpeggios on a single string going from the lowest to the highest available note (again, inspired by Berlin). Nothing before had had me learn the fingerboard as coherently... Well, Gart Willis' approach is also pretty good, and goes well in companion to Berlin's.
     
  12. GastonD. Thanks a bunch!!!
     
  13. kalanb

    kalanb

    Dec 17, 2012
    GastonD, what is the Gary Willis approach?
     
  14. GastonD

    GastonD

    Nov 18, 2013
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Yep, the second one, Fingerboard Harmony from Hal Leonard.
    While it may not seem too large in volume, it contains enough material for a LOT of work (even if tedious, in Willis' own words)! Also, the presented concepts and principles apply readily to both bass lines and soloing, so, a very valuable resource.
     
  15. Thanks guys! i'll look into the Willis book.
     

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