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orange osage as a fingerboard?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by allenhumble, Aug 17, 2007.


  1. allenhumble

    allenhumble Supporting Member

    Oct 22, 2004
    Acworth GA.
    What are the properties of this wood? Hard? soft? ect.
    Would this wood be a good or bad idea for a fingerboard?
     
  2. Taken from: http://www.lewis-clark.org/content/content-article.asp?ArticleID=2523
     
  3. Mr. Majestic

    Mr. Majestic Majestic Wood Supply Supporting Member

    Dec 3, 2005
    From Louisiana/In Arkansas
    Majestic Swamp Ash
    Osage orange is very heavy and very dense. It would work very well for a fingerboard.
     
  4. scottyd

    scottyd Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2006
    Waco Tx
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
    It’s used a lot in bow making because of its strength. It’s also known as Bodark, around here its known as a horse apple tree. I want to try it in a neck application. I don't know about the stability though. Another wood to check out is Pecan or Hickory also very hard woods. If you decide to use it please keep us informed!
     
  5. allenhumble

    allenhumble Supporting Member

    Oct 22, 2004
    Acworth GA.
    Does it typicaly have that birdseye look to it? Or is that a rare thing?
     
  6. Mr. Majestic

    Mr. Majestic Majestic Wood Supply Supporting Member

    Dec 3, 2005
    From Louisiana/In Arkansas
    Majestic Swamp Ash
    (Maclura pomifera) Horse apple, hedge apple, Bois d'arc, Osage orange, naranjo chino, Bodark, Bodock. This wood was mainly used in bow making and was also used for fence posts in which many would take root if not dried properly. It is the most decay resistant wood in North America and has the highest BTU burn rating than any other wood. The railroads also used it for crossties because it was so durable. I have a large piece that has been stored outside for at least 15 years and the only thing that has changed is the bark. I want to use it, but I can't get anybody to cut it for me.
     
  7. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    They're more like small burl clusters.

    That picture can't be accurate for color, though- I've never seen osage orange anywhere near that deep, bright orange in color. Or anywhere near. It's one of the few woods I've come in lots of contact with over the years outside of instruments that happens to also be used in luthiery.

    It's very hard and would work really well, but I don't know if I'd expect it to be quite that bright!
     

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