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Original Flex vs Eudoxa

Discussion in 'Strings [DB]' started by Wyzird05, Dec 16, 2003.


  1. Wyzird05

    Wyzird05

    Dec 1, 2003
    South Bend, IN
    I just purchased a set of original flexocor strings and before installing them wondered how they would compare to eudoxas. The store I buy from has a fresh set of eudoxas and I have always been curious about gut. I want a nice big, fat, warm sound. So does anyone have an opinion on Original Flexcor vs Eudoxas and which of the strings will give me that big fat warm sound I want?
     
  2. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    I've used both and I personally think you can't even compare these two strings. Gut has very unique characteristics including the sound and the tuning instability. In terms of the sound you get from Eudoxas (which I currently in a mixed set with Olivs), the Flexocors IMHO are in the same class as Innovations, and Obligatos, all of which I tried before and did not like.
     
  3. Wyzird05

    Wyzird05

    Dec 1, 2003
    South Bend, IN
    I went with eudoxas and although they have only been on for 26 hours the sound from my bass is awesome! It's so warm and vibrant, and I can't believe how the harmonics ring. I took the bass to work and tried out a couple bows on my lunch hour, and one of the other bassists I work with listened and I let him play and really got chills over how much better the sound is. Next I am looking into getting an MPM tailpiece.
     
  4. Adrian - When you say tuning instability, do you mean you must tune up every day (which I do) or do you mean the strings will go out of tune while I'm playing?

    In our orchestra, we sometimes tune up twice in a two hour rehearsal, but no more often. Whould these be that much of a problem?

    Wyzird05 - Since you too are bowing, and it sounds like you are playing orchestral music,
    what kind of bass is this that seems to have come alive with the Eudoxas?

    Is it fully carved, hybrid or fully laminated?
     
  5. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    I mean that changes in the temperature and humidity will have an obvious effect on the tuning of the strings. Here's one thing that happened to me:

    I was moving house and had to stay in a trailer for a while. I had to keep my bass at the office during this time. It's really dry there. The cores of the strings shrunk and subsequently all the windings started coming off the strings in various places. Result - $250 worth of strings down the tubes. Keep in mind that it was there for days and weeks at a time and sometimes I wouldn't get in there to play it for days or weeks so during that time the pitch of the strings would be really sharp (overtuned).

    Pirastro replaced them with a whole new set and gave me some others as well. Since then I always detune the strings after using and I've never had a problem since. When I go to a gig, if I don't get there early and leave the bass out to adjust then after the first set I can find the strings out by as much as almost a semitone depending on how different the environment is to where I brought the bass from (typically my house which is typically 18 deg. celsius and 47% humidity).

    There is a theory (although not really proven) that detuning the strings will not only prevent the situation I described from happening but may also prolong the life anyway and even relax the tension on the table of the bass. I don't know about the last bit - someone else suggested that.

    I only detune them about a semitone or a tone. Certainly not enough for the soundpost to move or fall down.

    In my opinion, the sound of these strings is plenty worth the trouble. I used the Velvet Animas before and whilst they didn't have the tuning problem, they just didn't have the same sound and arco response.

    My bass is a carved German - about 50 years old. The sound of my bass improved a lot when I started using low tension strings on it. It's a somewhat bright bass so the gut works well to balance that out.
     
  6. I recently switched from flexos to eudoxas; they don't even compare. the flexocores are a good steel orchestra string, and I like them. But the eudoxas are like heaven on my bass; the whole instrument resonates twice as much, and everything just sounds sweet and rich. They do go out of tune more often, but I couldn't care less. It's a tiny trade off for the sound. The only thing that's a little wierd at first is how thick the string are; they take some getting used to. I think they're also a bit rougher under the fingers, but that might just be becuase mine were not brand new. I say get the eudoxas, they rock!
     
  7. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    There is nothing like gut except gut! I use the Olivs on the G and D and the Eudoxas on the A and E. The Olivs are a little bit darker than the Eudoxas. The Oliv G is beautiful compared to many other Gs that I've tried. I find the windings on both very smooth. The Animas which are supposed to have machined flat rounding windings (flat on the outside but round on the inside where it contacts the core) were really, really rough on my fingerboard and fingers.

    I actually like the thicker strings. I hate using thinner strings - it feels like I'm playing a guitar!