Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Rockgurl, Dec 17, 2004.

  1. Rockgurl


    Dec 17, 2004
    CT, USA
    I've just joined a new band, and we're touring in January, which means I have a list of songs to learn as long as my arm. I've been practising about 4 to 5 hours a day so I can get this done to make the transition into this band smooth, but the last few nights I've been woken up by a searing white hot pain in my left arm, with numbness and pins and needles. I'm fine when I'm playing but if I just lie down and try to rest the pain starts and won't go, even if I shake my arm and try to let the blood flow back. I know I'm overdoing it a bit, but I have so much to do, and this band is funky, with very bass heavy songs...I have a lot to play. Anyone had this before? I know the answer is to slow down a bit but I can't! I have no time. [​IMG]
  2. EmmSee


    May 23, 2004
    Boston, MA
    Stretch.. Before and after playing..... and try to put your bass up higher on your body.

    You gotta warmup the body for the beating it's about to take... just like working out at the gym. Your left arm and right wrist are the ones getting the workin'.
  3. Squidfinger

    Squidfinger I wish I could sing like Rick Danko.

    Jan 7, 2004
    Shreveport LA
    Drink alot of water. It helps lubricate the tendons.
  4. I would'nt be too worried about it , it's just the transfering of your arms fingers whatever getting used to the workload that its being put through but yeah just make sure you warm up and do stretching exercises as Emmsee said so allow your body to get used to it , it does take time to adjust
  5. Rockgurl


    Dec 17, 2004
    CT, USA
    Thanks, I'll try the stretching. I drink lots of water anyway, and I did try to change the length of my strap and the position of my bass. I put it up higher, and I changed where I put my right hand in relation to the pickups. I guess I'll adjust eventually. I just don't want to get repetitive strain injury right before a tour.
  6. Christopher


    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    Relax and lighten up with both your right- and left-hand touch. One of the benefits of playing an amplified instrument is letting the amp do the hard work.
  7. I've got a question, and I might as well post it in here.

    I think I've started to develop an injury, as today for the first time i noticed a little sharp pain in my left middle finger's knuckle (the joint closest to the hand) and so I immediately put the bass down and haven't picked it up since.

    I figure i'll wait another day before I pick it up again and then try to start back up a little more slowly, but are there any additional steps to try to make sure I don't make this worse? I have been working my hands pretty hard since the middle of the summer, i typically can put in 1 - 3 hours of practice a day and while I feel them limbering up, I don't want to push them too far.
  8. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Ok here is a real medical tip for this problem! I am a progessinal bass player and man i get all kinds of nasty pain from it! My lower back my fingers my hands and worst of all my neck! (probably from playing in heavy metal bands in the 80s) lol but go to your Dr. and tell him this problem! He will probably give you something like flexiril<<?? to take after your palying! Also emu oil works a little!