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PA Amp and Mixer question

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by thewanderer24, Apr 21, 2004.


  1. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    Hopefully this is the right forum. Seemed appropriate to me.

    My one band is looking to upgrade our PA, and want to go modular, but we don't know much about mixers.

    We play rock, blues, funk, and sometimes softer music. We can be loud, but not heavy metal levels. We are typically playing small to medium sized bars and clubs.

    Band consists of drums, 1 guitar, me on bass and singer (1 or 2 extra vocal mics needed. We also have another guitarist and sax/flute player that play with us a lot of the time.

    Most of the time, the vocals would be all that's needed on the PA, plus the sax/flute if he's there. Sometimes we may mic the drums, but we rarely need PA support for the guitar or bass (though it'd be nice to run them into a monitor mix through the board).

    I know a bit about power amps from research while putting together my bass rig. I am thinking a QSC PLX 2402 or something comparable will be the power amp. Please speak up if you think this is not enough power.

    Can you guys please make some recommendations for a mixer, based on the above?? Important features and why they are needed would be good, and specific models would be very helpful.

    Keep in mind, the main purpose of this mixer is for playing live with a good sound. It may eventually be used for some recording purpose, but probably not in any kind of professional situation.

    Much appreciate all of your help.
     
  2. There are so many different mixers available covering such a wide range of price and features that a little more input would really help out. A good start would be to let us know how much money you have to spend (even approximately) and then we can make suggestions in that price range. Also, it wouldn't hurt to know how many mics you plan to run on the drums. I've counted a total of six channels thus far between vox and the instrumentation you listed. Give up a little more info!
     
  3. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    Sorry, forgot a dollar amount!!!

    Price range would be probably in the $1000 range, though I am curious if there is something that's a little more (probably up to about $1500) if it is worth the extra cash.

    For drums, we would have 1 to 3 mics depending on the scenario. I can't see us ever using more than 3 mics on the drums anytime we would be using this PA setup.
     
  4. bill h

    bill h

    Aug 31, 2002
    small town MN
    Also how many monitors do you need? Do you use lots of fx on the mix? what will you have for FOH sound for amps and speakers. ect...
     
  5. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    we tend to not use a ton of fx, but some fx on the board would probably be a good thing. We would use from 1 to 3 monitors, and probably 2 monitor mixes is enough.

    I don't know what you mean by "FOH"
     
  6. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    also, my singer said she was just looking at cfx series mixers at guitar center. Any comments on this?? I think this is a little cheaper than the $1000 number I gave, too.
     
  7. bill h

    bill h

    Aug 31, 2002
    small town MN
    FOH is front of house sound where back line is for monitors and guitar and bass amps and cabs.

    From what you have said I still like the Mackie.
     
  8. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    Do you think there is a noticeable difference in the mic preamps from the DLZ to the CLX line of mixers?? Again, assume this is mainly for fairly loud live settings.
     
  9. The Mackie VLZ series is pretty much the industry standard. It would be hard to go wrong with this mixer for either live or studio use. I have used them many times for both and they are solid, excellent sounding mixers with all the features you could reasonably use in your situation. I personally don't have any experience with the Mackie CFX line. My GF has a DFX 12 (made over-seas, discontinued) and it has worked great for her acoustic project. I'm not super fond of it but it has a lot of useable features, works well, and the effects sound decent enough for the price she paid ($250?). The sonic differences between the pre-amps in the DFX and VLZ are more then noticeable. The major difference (just speculation here) between the CFX and VLZ is going to lie in the fact that the CFX has built in effects.
     
  10. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    thanks. this has been very helpful. Appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions!!!
     
  11. rockindoc

    rockindoc Daily Lama

    Jan 26, 2002
    Bonham, Tx
    You should also look at Allen & Heath. The MixWizard 16/2 DX can be had for around $900.
     
  12. I have the Mackie CFX with 20 inputs I think, 16 mic and 4 line. Anyway, it is nice as it has effects and built in EQ. I've also worked with many VLZ models over the years and they are outstanding in their price range. The VLZ offers more options with effects sends and returns and more options with monitors. The mic pre-amps are probably better but I've not had the chance to A/B them side by side. I don't think you can go wrong with either the VLZ or the CFX...........jmo..........