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PA Setup Question

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by whatsinaname, Feb 21, 2003.


  1. Is there an "order" or standard operating procedure for setting up the PA during sound check? ex: kick drum followed by snare, etc....
     
  2. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    Yes. The drums are usually done 1st, starting w/ kick, then snare, then toms, then the whole kit. Repeat until everyone is tired of hearing isolated snare hits. This will take 75% of the soundcheck. The bass will then be checked, using 1% of the time because the sound guy isn't going to put you in the mix anyway. The rest is spent on guitar and vocals. If either the guitarist or the vocalist whines a lot, your time will go over 100%.
     
  3. crossXbones

    crossXbones

    Sep 17, 2002
    Florida
    haha yea. sound checks depend greatly on how good the sound guy is and how well the band treats the sound guy.
     
  4. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    You guys totally forgot the part where when you're trying to get a good sound for the vocals, the drummer all of a sudden starts playing super loud so you can't set up the vox, then no matter how much you scream at him to stop, he can't hear you and keeps playing.
     
  5. Thanks for the replys. My curiosity was mainly centered around the drum kit. (should have said that in the initial post).So, let me see if I have this right.....Bass drum, snare, mounted toms, floor toms, hi-hat, crash and ride? Do you run compression on any, all, or none of the kit?
    Drums, vocals, guitars would all be on separate sub-mixes with bass running straight to the mains.
    Would that be right?
     
  6. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    That's actually what I do, but I don't run compression or gates on the drums, maybe some reverb, but that's it.
     
  7. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    Good sound guys w/ lots of experience can run w/out compressors or gates on the drums. Everybody else should consider using them until they get experience. They make it quicker and easier to set up and much easier to control. If you lack experience, you don't know what to watch/listen for, and 6 mics on a kit w/out proper eq and no gating is a lot to handle when you're also trying to mix the rest of the band. If you're trying to run your own sound from the stage (no sound guy) a multi-channel gate can also be a big help. Of course, if your band has a reasonable stage volume in the first place, you may not need any gating. For loud rock bands w/ hyperactive drummers, they can really help.
     
  8. :D :D :D
     
  9. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    Funny, but true. :D
     
  10. crossXbones

    crossXbones

    Sep 17, 2002
    Florida
    dude u can do it any way you want if your the sound guy...but yea that is how you usally do it. gates and compression are a waste of time...unless of course you have no idea what your doing....only good for newbies and with certain types of music/bands. and we never put the bass in the mix cause their amps are always so fricking loud....which is not a bad thing :bassist:
     
  11. Umm... ladies and gentlemen....

    When used properly, gates can really clean up a drum kit thru FOH. Why have seven +/- (drumkit) microphones picking up bleedover all night?:confused:

    JMO
     
  12. crossXbones

    crossXbones

    Sep 17, 2002
    Florida
    yes that is a good point, but i hardly ever have that problem. if you have good mics and position them correctly it shouldn't be too much of a problem.....though i don't remember ever using more than 6 mics on a kit.
     
  13. Good point, specially in a high SPL situation.
    Compression may be a matter of "taste", but most loud rock bands would benefit from gates on the drum kit. I can't think of anything worse sounding than a resonating drum head being amplified into the mix. (Well, ok...screeching feedback or rotten vocalists are high on the list as well.) For light jazz or wedding band situations it probably wouldn't make much difference because the gain and overall volume would be so much lower. Besides, doesn't a wedding band sound check consist of "test... 1,2,3,4"?
     
  14. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Yeah, but that's more of a head tuning problem. You shouldn't NEED to use gates unless you're drummer can't tune his heads. Otherwise, like stated above, it's a taste issue.
     
  15. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    Everything jondog said!

    The two drummers I play with are not too keen on long sound checks though, so we get a bit more time for other instruments and vocals. :)

    Most of the time we go: Individual drums, drum kit, bass, drums+bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals, everything together in one or two songs.

    I do most of the PA setup so I always get too little time for my bass sound though... :(
     
  16. Slater

    Slater Bye Millen! Hello?

    Apr 17, 2000
    The Great Lakes State
    whatsinaname, I saw your band back in January at Cool Jerks. IIRC, the drummer's kit sounded more than a little out of tune.
    (The band sounded good though :cool: )
     
  17. crossXbones

    crossXbones

    Sep 17, 2002
    Florida
    yea i hate it when a drum resonates through the PA. i always ask the drummer if he could retune his head and hope he gets it right the second time. geesh...drummers:)