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pao ferro

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by cgworkman, May 21, 2004.


  1. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
    What is the deal with pao ferro? I've noticed allot of basses have pao ferro as a fretboard option?

    Pros? Cons?

    :bassist:
     
  2. i believe it's supposed to have the tonal qualities of maple but have a darker look.

    i'm sure someone will correct me AND they will be right! :)
     
  3. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    It's a purty orange-to-red wood that manages to be harder than, yet less clacky-sounding, than ebony. Aka morado.
     
  4. bassturtle

    bassturtle

    Apr 9, 2004
    I've had it on a couple of basses and loved it. I'd liken it to a cross between rosewood and ebony.
     
  5. ignore this post please... is there a way to delete your own post?
     
  6. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
    not sure - but you can edit it by clicking the "edit" button on the right hand corner of your post
     
  7. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
  8. the reason for the second post... another tb'er posted and i commented on his post, but then it was gone so i edited mine into what you see now. :eyebrow:

    i've never actually played pao ferro so unless usacg is wrong... there you go. :)
     
  9. my peavey cirrus has a pau ferro board and I agree that it is like like a cross between rosewood and ebony. it has the bright attack of ebony and maple but the rouned tone quality of rosewood. it seems to work very nice on my cirrus.
     
  10. JPJ

    JPJ

    Apr 21, 2001
    Chicago, IL
    Both of these basses have pau ferro boards. As for the tonal properties described above, I generally agree with the assessment: a wood that has tonal properties similar to (in-between) maple and ebony, but with more of a "rosewood" look.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. that's what i love about this place... you just learn all kind of information. :D

    cg - you thinking about getting a bass with pao ferro? or are you just curious about the wood?
     
  12. It also costs less than rosewood.
     
  13. Funkize you

    Funkize you Guest

    Nov 4, 2003
    Westminster Ca.
    Pau Ferro offers Ultra-crisp high's, it Brightens up all the notes on the board and look's Much better than Maple, but realistically has Most of the same properties.
     
  14. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
    is there a sure way to tell between rosewood and pao ferro visually? i won a bass in a giveaway - but i was never told what the fretboard material was. when i look up the bass manufactuer - they offer maple, rosewood and pao ferro for that model.....

    how can i tell if it's rosewood or pao ferre?
     
  15. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
    i figured it out - click the edit button for your post - above the box where your message is there are buttons to click - one of them is "delete this message"
     
  16. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Pao Ferro is generally lighter and more orange than rosewoods (it can look about like bubinga sometimes). Just a little though. It is also more likely to be smoother, with fewer open pores, than rosewood on a fingerboard -- except maybe a high quality rosewood.
     
  17. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    I thought it was a specic type of Rosewood grown in a certain region. The Pau Ferro board on my Fender USA Jazz V is a pleasure.
     
  18. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Nope, it's not actually part of the rosewood family.
     
  19. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Yes, I know it is commonly called rosewood.

    True rosewoods are of the genus "dalbergia" though. Notice that Pau Ferro and "Bolivian Rosewood" are not in this family.

    Lots of woods have been called rosewoods that are not.

    The third paragraph is just really wrong. All of the "var." entries they list are different types of wood, some from different parts of the world.

    Real rosewoods include Brazilian, Indian, and palisander rosewood; cocobolo; kingwood; and African blackwood (there are more of course).