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Passive Tone control

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by OnederTone, Sep 5, 2002.


  1. OnederTone

    OnederTone Aguilar Everywhere Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2002
    Thornton, CO
    as in on an active bass? I know *WHAT* this is, but I'm not to sure HOW and with what electronics etc...

    so would someone mind giving me the complete 411 on it... I'm looking into having a bass built and haven't thought about this as an option until now...

    Thanks.
     
  2. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    a passive tone control is cut only - simple rc (resistor-capacitor) circuit. if your instrument already has an active preamp in it, why would you want this?
     
  3. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Some Sadowskies have the option of a passive tone control with the usual two band EQ. I played one (in Roger's shop, no less!) and it sounded like... a passive tone control. If you're dealing with a boost-only preamp, I can see where that would be helpful.
     
  4. BFunk

    BFunk Supporting Member

    Because it is easier to do a quick tone change using a single tone control then it is to fiddle with active eq circuits during a live performance.
     
  5. OnederTone

    OnederTone Aguilar Everywhere Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2002
    Thornton, CO
    that was kinda my question...
    I've seen it on many basses, some with it only when the active controls are bypassed (i.e. Wal) others where it's always there (foderas with pope preamps?)

    I also see it as an option on the Aguliar install sheet for the OBP1...
     
  6. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    well, since all the passive tone control is going to do is roll off the high frequency, most active eqs have the same capability, or at least similar, in a single knob. combine that with the fact that the instrument in question is already set up as active, and i still can't imagine why you would want a passive tone control in an active instrument.
     
  7. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Short answer.. if you have a passive mode it's nice to have a passive tone control (or controls, more later).

    The J-Retro deluxe has a passive tone control. It actually is a nice option for a quick tonal change. Sometimes it is nice to just roll off some of the highs or bring them back up. Can the same thing be done with the three band EQ? Not really... the passive usually affects a different sonic area than the EQ controls. Of course if you had a semi-or fully parametric treble control... but that's hardly as easy as turning one knob.

    The G&L L2000 also has tone controls that work when the bass is switched to passive. The cool thing is you have bass and treble controls in passive mode as well as active.

    I think it's a nice feature but since I rarely switch to passive mode... :)

    I know some people do use passive and it's better than having no control in that mode IMO.
     
  8. BFunk

    BFunk Supporting Member

    How so? The treble control cuts/boosts at a particular frequency, (with a fairly wide Q usually). This is not the same, to me, as using a low pass filter. That's why I think that the ideal active eq would include a shelving eq with variable knee.
     
  9. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    well, ime quite a few of my basses' active eqs' treble control have the same effect as a passive tone on the high freq in practical application, and i use it in a similar manner - "too clicky, roll some high off". with a fairly wide Q, it's going to be hard to tell the difference, since the only differentiating factor would be frequencies higher than the effective range of the treble control, which i've never experienced through my rig. ymmv, of course.