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Patitucci bass progressions

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by highwattage, Mar 10, 2008.


  1. I've started to listen to more Jaco / Patitucci recently. Especially Patitucci. I've played rock, metal, funk, and more recently blues lately, but Patitucci's playing doesn't really seem to fit any scales like blues, bepop, or standard greek based scales. Does he use a lot of accidentals, or is their something that I'm just completely missing something. :confused::confused::confused:
     
  2. He doesnt simply construct solos using scales otherwise things would get mighty boring fast.

    Like most guys who have a solid ability to solo, alot of what he does is based around modal patterns (well...ok...they are simple variations to the major scale), chordal substitution, arpeggiation and inversions thereof all while progressing through the chord changes of a tune.He solos like a horn player would. If you solo using simple scalar patterns...you just sound like...well...you are playing scales

    PS...there's no such thing as a be bop scale (well no that im aware of anyway). The basis of be bop is some of what i have alluded to above( and a lot more!)
     
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Bebop scales are created by adding a Major 7 to the Mixolydian scale or the major 3rd to the Dorian mode.
     
  4. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    So, in the Key of "C"-

    ii = D-E-F-F#-G-A-B-C-D
    V7 = G-A-B-C-D-E-F-F#-G

    If you note, it places the Root on Beat 1 (if running the scale up & down).

    Packer-
    What's this one called...Bebop Major?-
    I? = C-D-E-F-G-G#-A-B-C
     
  5. Mikey D

    Mikey D

    Nov 30, 2006
    Birmingham, UK
    Another note, "bebop scales" are stylistically almost exclusively used descending.
     
  6. so in other words, a bebop scale is a major scale with a flat7 and a major 7, or a natural minor scale with a major 3rd and a sharp 6 (b7 enharmonic equivalent )? makes sense......

    ok...i stand corrected
     
  7. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Dr. Funkensteen-

    Personally, I would not remember them in that fashion...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebop_scale

    Major Bebop scale has a chromatic passing tone located between the 5th & 6th
    C-D-E-F-G-G#-A-B-C

    Dominant Bebop scale has a chromatic passing tone located between the 3rd & 4th
    G-A-B-C-D-E-F-F#-G

    Dorian Bebop scale has a chromatic passing tone located between the b7th & the root
    D-E-F-F#-G-A-B-C-D
     
  8. Hoover

    Hoover Banned

    Nov 2, 2007
    New York City


    Except that if it's truly a "dominant" scale in terms of function then it's the F natural that's the passing tone in between the 2nd & (major) 3rd.

    And if it's supposed to function as a minor mode than the word "dominant" is completely erroneous & misleading.
     
  9. Some Pattitucci/Michael Brecker type modern jazz scales can be found in the modes of the ascending melodic minor scale. Also look at how the diminished scale fits over altered dominant 7th chords.

    You are probably also hearing a lot of stuff that is not based on scales as much as on the voicings of the chords embellished with chromatic passing tones.
     
  10. lefty007

    lefty007

    Jan 19, 2004
    Miami, FL
    I don't know schlitz about theory, but doesn't Patitucci use a lot of tonal improvisation?

    Whatever it is, Patitucci rules.
     
  11. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999

    Actually, my Copy/Paste technique needs some sheddin'.

    The Dominant example was supposed to be-
    G-A-B-C-D-E-F-F#-G
    F# is the passing tone between the b7 & Root

    The Dorian example was supposed to be-
    D-E-F-F#-G-A-B-C-D
    Passing tone between the 3rd & 4th.

    I edited the post in-question...sorry about that.
     
  12. let me elaborate a little bit:

    in his song "our family"(watch it on youtube, it is excellent), he plays a chord six times syncopated (im pretty sure) and then plays seven or so other notes. Then he does the little jazzy side lick that he seems to make use of a lot in a similar fashion in other songs, sometimes with extra notes. That is what I'm really wondering about.
     

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