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Pbass control plate!

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Stilettoprefer, Aug 2, 2012.


  1. Stilettoprefer

    Stilettoprefer

    Nov 26, 2010
    2b9c8bbd.

    Inspired by the jazz bass and telecaster plate.

    And quite possibly my favorite mod, since I don't have to wire any grounds to the backs of the pots, and it improves strength around the jack:D

    Working at a machine shop is great!
     
  2. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    definitely a good idea mechanically; allparts even sells one.

    if my P didn't sport an extra-awesome (and impossible to find) bold, swirly tortoise guard, i might get one of these, along with modding the pickguard to reverse the pickup orientation.
     
  3. PlungerModerno

    PlungerModerno

    Apr 12, 2012
    Ireland
    Cool, I'd say If it were a structural thing, the all metal pickguard would be ideal (gives you a huge stable plate thats fully grounded).

    Also looks shiny: @ about 2:35 and elsewhere. The bass track isn't as played, at all.
     
  4. Stilettoprefer

    Stilettoprefer

    Nov 26, 2010
    I would have just bought one, but the cavity routes for this bass are a mess (GFS not me) and are barely covered by a pick guard. So all of the holes in that section were suspended in air. I made the plate slightly over sized so that the screws would actually hit wood. One of the holes still ended up in the air though:p.

    And having a machinist in the shop do it for free is a lot cheaper than getting one online haha.

    Edit: and I like the shape of the one I had made more than all parts version.
     
  5. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    yeah, the allparts one has a rounded end to it, necessitating a very tricky concave cut in the pickguard to match up with it.
     
  6. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett

    Feb 8, 2005
    Palm Bay, FL
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    Had that done with my P pickguard, which was even trickier since it's the gold anodized variety. Turned out great tho and I think it evens out the tone a bit.
     
  7. bumperbass

    bumperbass Supporting Member

    Jun 19, 2012
    Not to question Leo Fender's design of the P-Bass as we know it, but I've always wondered why he positioned the pickups like he did, and not reversed. IMO, wouldn't it be better to have the lower two strings Have slightly more treble, and have the top two strings more toward the neck for less twang on the thinner strings?
    Again, I don't mean to second-guess a legend like Leo. I'm sure he tried it both ways!
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    he did the same thing with the tele and strat bridge pickups!

    my theory is that they were trying to get a wider bandwidth (higher highs, lower lows) out of the crappy speakers and low-powered tube amps of the day (late '50s, remember).

    it's only with more modern and higher fidelity amplification that the idea of narrowing bandwidth of the instrument for more evenness makes sense.
     
  9. Stealth

    Stealth

    Feb 5, 2008
    Zagreb, Croatia
    That, and Leo was hard of hearing, meaning he didn't hear as much treble as we did. So he did all he could to get more treble, including slanting the pickups.

    On topic: I agree, the metal plate looks very slick. Also, is that black insulating tape on the pickups?
     
  10. Stilettoprefer

    Stilettoprefer

    Nov 26, 2010
    Yep, black electrical tape is applied to open pole pieces because I tend to smack the strings into the magnets when i really dig in, and that makes a really ugly noise. It also keeps sweat and metal pieces (i always have metal dust on me) out of the magnets.
     
  11. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    oh, i would never just trust the mechanical connection like that!

    it's easy to run a real ground wire, and it saves you that onstage headache when a loose pot or jack also means your signal cutting in and out :atoz:
     
  12. Stilettoprefer

    Stilettoprefer

    Nov 26, 2010
    I'm one of those weird guys that double checks everything before a gig, and always has a backup bass. (this is actually my backup bass, but not by much)

    And some locktite on those threads will keep the pots and jack in place until you don't want them in place anymore.

    I'll still probably end up adding a real ground eventually, but until then, this will work just fine:p
     
  13. bumperbass

    bumperbass Supporting Member

    Jun 19, 2012
    Just curious as to why you have that copper foil running from the bridge to the plate? Isn't the wire already there?
     
  14. Stilettoprefer

    Stilettoprefer

    Nov 26, 2010
    It is, but something went bonkers with some old hack wiring and the only way it would work is if the jack was touching the bridge. So I put that piece of foil there to connect them.

    Since then, the finish (acrylic lacquer with nitro clear) has darkened around the foil, so I just leave it there. It also grounds the shielding tape in the cavity.
     

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