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pbass=humbucker in parallel???

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by bass_drum, Jun 20, 2005.


  1. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    I was wondering, since there arent many 5 string pbasses, could u not get a 5 string bass and put a humbucker in it but wire it in parallel to get it to sound like a pbass?
     
  2. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't a typical P bass wired in series?
     
  3. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    yes u are probably right, i am very unknowledgeable when it comes to this kind of thing.
     
  4. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    In my experience, P pups are no different than any others, they all sound different. And to be honest, to date, I've got some quality Fender vintage P tone from some J pups I've had and probably as good a p tone from most of the J's that I've gotten from any P. These are 4 string pups though. From memory, the active EMG P and SD hot P seems have produced the most appealing results to me so far.
     
  5. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    ???


    Im wondering if I can buy a 5 string humbucker and wire it in series to get a pbass sound, since there arent very many 5 string pbass pickups, but there are quite a few 5 string humbuckers.
     
  6. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    In other words, it's not the style of pickup or how it's wired that will yield a P tone, it's the particular pickup in relation to a myriad of other factors. I'd be willing to bet that if you get a Bongo pickup, it will have a P tone. A Bongo is an HB, MM's are HB's, there are humbucking J's, there are humbucking soaps. HB simply refers to dual coils with reverse wiring.

    Can you definitively take any HB and get a P tone regardless of how it's wired - probably no more than you can take any pup style and get a given tone.
     
  7. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    It all depends on how much of a P-bass tone purist you are.

    Whenever I play my Fender Roscoe Beck 5, I use the middle bucker in series mode. I wouldn't say it's exactly like a P-bass, but it's pretty darn close.

    A variety of 5-string humbucking pickups exist. Some have two coils per string (side-by-side), others have one coil per string in a 3+2 configuration. Either type wired in series should give you a nice phat sound, but the trick is having access to both coils (four leads) so you can change the wiring to series (if the coils aren't already wired that way).

    As I recall, bartolini is good about giving the user access to all coils of a pickup.
     
  8. I gave up my Roscoe Beck V because I could not get a decent P tone from it, even with flats. A long phone call to Bill Lawrence was quite revealing, as he is the designer of the RBV pickup system.

    The P pickup has short, large diameter magnets compared to the tall and skinny ones found in the J. Bill told me the P is efficient and has low flux leakage, compared to the J which does not. In other words, they are two different animals.

    Another part of the P tone is the location of the pickup. The Musicman/L1500 location is close to a P, but is also a sweet spot of its own.

    I figured out the only way to get a P tone is... get a P. Then get an L1500 for MM, and a Jazz for J. I can then run flats on the P, have spare basses, multiple tones, and satisfy GAS issues all at the same time.