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peavey cirrus production runs

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by MattyN, May 26, 2003.


  1. MattyN

    MattyN

    May 26, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    i just bought a peavey cirrus 4 on eBay for $850. its a 2002 maple body that was listed as "absolute mint" - never been gigged out. its now in the mail.

    this is the first time i've ever bought an instrument without playing it first so i'm a little nervous (i've played cirrus basses in stores and was blown away but couldn't bring myself to drop $1000+).

    my question is, have any of you found the playability of the cirrus to fluctuate from one production run to another?

    if so, which years are da goods?

    thanks,

    matty N
     
  2. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    I have two Cirrus (Cirri ?) basses and have played dozens in various stores. I've never found a bad one, although some could have had better setups, which is the stores fault.
     
  3. Poon

    Poon

    May 20, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    I have to agree with Phat Bastard. I have two Cirri and have played at least 20 different Cirri and I haven't found a problem with one. Its true that the action, pickup height and general setup could be better on some of them, but that is subjective. People like their basses setup differently and that's probably why shops set them up that way. I'm thinking about getting a third Cirrus as well because I love them that much, but I may get a 4 or a 6. But perhaps I might save my money and get a Stingray 5 as well. But to answer your question, if the Bass is in Mint Condition, it will probably be okay. One of the used ones that I bought off e-bay for $700 out the door was in a bit of rough shape, but I cleaned her up and now she is a beaut. :D Just be prepared to do some work on the bass if need be. Congrats on your first Cirrus. They are truly great basses.
     
  4. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali
    I owned a Cirrus 6 for awhile and now own a 5. I can't say enough gret things about mine. They're fantastic basses. Like the others, I've played several and have never found a bad one in the mix. I've found some set ups that left me wondering but at no fault of the basses themselves. My only gripe is I can't find a used maple top/alder body 5 anywhere.
     
  5. MattyN

    MattyN

    May 26, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    this really helps to keep the jitters in check while i wait for this baby to arrive...

    other questions:
    1. what strings do you prefer on your cirrus?
    2. for what style(s) of play?

    (yes, i'm aware there are previous threads on this but they're kind of all over the map.)
     
  6. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali
    I use Cirrus strings or, recently, D'addario Slow Wounds also. Both are great.

    Style? Rock, blues, funk, whatever. The Cirrus does it all. However, I've never bought into the idea that a bass is designed for a particular style of music. Pick a bass you like and play it in the music you like. It's as simple as that for me.
     
  7. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    1. D'Addario XL170SL (SL=Super Long because of the 35" scale) with a .120 or .125-B, .100-E, .080-A, .065-D, .045-G, and a .035-C .

    2. Everything.
     
  8. MattyN

    MattyN

    May 26, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    Yeah, good point... I generally like lighter gauge strings for slapping but the Cirrus maple seems to have a reputation for being super bright. I wanna make sure I still have some thunder. ;)

    I like D'Addario's so I'll start there... thanks.
     
  9. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Could be, but I'm pretty sure Tom Peterson didn't design the 12-string bass for Jazz,
    or Country, or Classical, or......;) :bassist:
     
  10. Poon

    Poon

    May 20, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    One thing that you might have not known is that certain types of Cirrus had the Carbon Fiber Headstock and others had the straight black headstock. I don't think one has more residual value than the other, but just another detail about the Cirruses that you may not have known. The two that I own play very differently surprisingly. One one, I have Cirrus Strings (The newer one) and the other I have Ernie Ball Roundwounds (The Green Package (45's-130's)) and they seem to work very well. I've also tried Rotosound's on the bass and they worked well, but they are a bit more expensive and I don't think their sound justified the additional price. The wood combination and string difference make my two Cirri very different animals with the same beautiful playability. Hope that helps ya out. I also play with GHS Boomers on my 4 String Stingray, D'Addario XL's on my 6-String Curbow, and I've even tried $5.99 string from Eppiphone on my Fender P-Bass(Good for the money). I've tried quite a few brands, but really haven't settled on one brand that i'm loyal to. I still haven't tried Elixors, but I've heard mixed reviews about them and they are pricey. Tons of options. But if you've found a brand that you like that lasts a long time and sounds good, go with that. Don't be afraid to try out different sets once you've had the bass a while.
     
  11. MattyN

    MattyN

    May 26, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    interesting about the headstock.

    i've been using elixers and Ernie Ball regulars on my BTB... the elixers are nice but i'm not sure they're worth the $$. i like the EB's better right out of the package but the elixers definitely last longer.

    but yeah, i spose expirimentation is the key.

    can't wait to get my hands on this bass!!!! :cool:
     
  12. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali




    Who the hell's Tom Peterson?:confused: :help:
     
  13. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    The original and current (he left for a number of years) bassist for Cheap Trick. He was the original designer of the 12-string bass (4-string tripled/primary + 2 extra strings one octave up. Not a 6-string doubled like John Paul Jones has).

    In the 70s, it took him forever to convince Hamer to build one (they thought the neck couldn't handle all the extra tension). When they finally did it was only 30 1/2" scale. Eventually they started producing full 34" scale models. These were the first 12-string basses before Chandler, Warwick, Modulus, etc. ever thought of producing such an item. Only 8-strings (non-paired) were available.

    They are used quite frequently (Kings X, Pearl Jam, etc.) but I've never seen/heard one outside of Rock music.

    Side note: Modulus once produced an 18-string bass (6-string tripled) :eek: for Tom, but he didn't like it and it eventually ended up in the late Allen Woody's (Allman Bros., Gov't Mule) collection.
     

  14. "They are used quite frequently (Kings X, Pearl Jam, etc.) but I've never seen/heard one outside of Rock music."


    The number of 12-string bassists in other genres of music is slowly growing. I've personally used one for country music for a number of years. You wouldn't believe the new life it can breathe into the old country classics, let alone contemporary country songs.

    A big reason 12's haven't been used widely before now is largely due to the cost. Until a couple of years ago a 12 would set you back about $2,000 or better. Now with the Korean imports you can pick up a new 12 for under $400. I predict that within a very few years you'll start seeing them everywhere.

    :cool:
     
  15. Whoah! Where do you get these 12-strings for $400?:meh:
     
  16. "Whoah! Where do you get these 12-strings for $400?"

    Watch eBay! It's a buyers market right now, and there have been quite a number of them that have gone for $400 or less. Brand new basses! Brands like Galveston, Marcus Martini and Venson (all made by the same company in Korea, a Galveston is shown below in the natural finish) are really decent for the money. Plus the Dean Rhapsody's have been going for just a little higher than that. I picked up a Hamer CH-12 for my wife (one of the few women to play a 12) in the white finish brand new for $450.

    To learn more about these brands just check out my new 12-string bass website for the details. My wife's picture with her bass is in the Hamer Players photo gallery. She might be better looking than me but I can still outplay her! :D

    [​IMG]
     
  17. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    I believe there's a company called Audiovox that has a 12 string thats even cheaper (-$400). I've also seen the Hamer Chaparrell (?) import version on eBay go for as little as $400+ on occasion.
     
  18. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    First time I've heard of that. Mine has the carbon fiber laminate on the face of the headstock. All of the others that I've run across have been the same. Now I think that the quilt top tiger-eye has a matching, quilted headstock.
     
  19. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    That's been my experience as well. The TigerEye and the Claro Walnut have matching headstocks, the rest all supposedly have the carbon fiber overlay on the headstock. Peavey marketed that as a "feature" that helped reduce the energy that dissapates through the headstock. Whether it really helps or not... :confused: Now that's a different story :p

    - Frank.
     
  20. Poon

    Poon

    May 20, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The Proof is in the Pudding. :bassist:

    98% of the time I encounter Cirri with a Carbon Fiber Headstock, but there are those ocassions. Just so happens I got one of them.