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Peavey Cirrus wood choices...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by misterk73, Sep 26, 2002.


  1. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Although I'm just a poor student right now, I'm hungering for a 35-inch scale 6-string bass these days (I recenbtly acquired a five-string and have fallen in love with the possibilities of a bass with more than four strings).

    With all the talk about the Peavey Cirrus around here, I feel obliged to check one out. I played one used, unplugged, at a local Guitar Center once for about 10 minutes. I like what I felt, but that's the extent of my experience with them.

    So, the question: Can anyone describe the tonal qualities of the various wood combinations the Cirrus comes in?
     
  2. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    That helps a bit, thanks. It sounds as if the now-MIA "cirrus woods page" is what I'm really after. Anyone know if there's a mirror or copy somewhere online?

    If anyone has anything else to offer up on the topic of Cirrus woods and their characteristic tone, I'd love to hear it.
     
  3. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Check out the tone of the walnut/bubinga on my bass page. Song with Maurice Fitzgerald on the bass.

    http://home.tampabay.rr.com/rrrrrrrr/hammond.wma

    The wenge/walnut and bubinga/walnut seem to sound similar, with the tops adding little. The biggest differences compared to the walnut woods would come from redwood or maple bodies. The maple Cirrus basses I have tried are brighter sounding. The walnut basses area darker and richer sounding.
     
  4. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    Judging from my Bubinga/Walnut Cirrus, it may be darkER-sounding than the maple one, but that's not saying that it's an especially DARK-sounding bass. Not compared to most other basses. I think in general, the Cirrus is a pretty bright bass, with that high, sizzling treble that so many modern designs have. But it does have a very deep and round bottom to it as well. It is somewhat lacking in the middle midrange, it's got the "honk" and "punch" factors of the midrange but not very much to offer in-between. It sort of dies after 400 Hz and comes alive again around 1 kHz. At least that's what my ears are telling me.

    The Hammond/Fitzgerald WMA Rick linked is very telling of what you can expect tone-wise from the walnut-bodied Cirri. Pickup pan close to the center is all you need to achieve something similar. (That song kicks ass, BTW.)

    What you can't expect from the Cirrus is dynamics. Its output is pretty compressed-sounding, making it fairly forgiving to uneven touch. That makes it even easier to play, but when you want that shocking KLANG! from it, it sort of only reaches halfway.
     
  5. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    It sounds like walnut is more up my alley than the maple, that's for sure.

    I think my questions have changed to:

    +What would be the best Cirrus wood(s) to balance out some of that "sizzling treble"?

    +In general, I prefer a warmer bass sound with BIG bottom. Does that mean something like a Cirrus would be a poor choice for me?
     
  6. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Very well said. My experience exactly.
     
  7. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Walnut I think.

    No, because the bass can be boosted more than adequately to compensate. The BIG bottom will just rock the city, not the world.
     
  8. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    Alder/Redwood perhaps? No personal experience with it, but it's said to be more "vintage" sounding than the bubinga/walnut. I can't imagine a "vintage"-sounding Cirrus, but it could sound "looser" than the others... that I could imagine.

    You could also use the treble filter on the onboard preamp. :D
    Big bottom can be achieved, but not P-bass bottom. I don't think you'll get any of those purring, semi-distorted lows ("warmth") that e.g. a Fender Jazz can put out, the Cirrus has an entirely different character.
     
  9. winston

    winston Supporting Member

    May 2, 2000
    Berkeley, CA
    I don't think the Maple/Alder (I had a 6) or Redwood/Alder (I have a fretless 5) combos have what I'd call a sizzling or harsh high end. I think you can get a really big but distinct (though not particularly P-like) tone by plucking over the fingerboard with pickup blend favoring the neck.

    I usually cut a tiny little bit of treble and get different tones by changing my hand position/attack and varying the pickup blend. I occasionally boost lows/mids a bit when using the bridge pickup but I've always been impressed by how good this bass sounds no matter where the controls are set. It sounds huge recorded even with everything set flat.

    I wouldn't say the Cirrus is unresponsive to dynamics, but I do think that the tone stays pretty similar whether you're playing loud or soft. This is a lot different than my FBass BN5 which sounds warm, round, and vintage when plucked lightly but really gets punchy when I start to dig in.

    I have noticed that the Bubinga/Walnut and Wenge/Walnut Cirruses do have a more compressed overall response than the Maple and Redwood, but that's not necessarily a bad thing-it may help give those wood combos their powerful, cutting midrange.