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Peavey Cirrus woods

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Schwinn, Apr 27, 2003.


  1. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    I've never believed that type of body wood is a major contributor to tone, but now that I'm shopping for a new bass I'm curious what others think: is it just about looks or do different woods sound different?

    This is in reference to choices for a Peavey Cirrus 5...walnut, maple, bubinga, redwood. Which would you choose and why?

    Personally, I'm thinking more about walnut or bubinga because I like the way they look.
     
  2. temp5897

    temp5897 Guest

    Have you ever tried the same bass that only had different body woods? They will sound quite quite different...

    As far as the Peavey goes, if it were me I would choose walnut for looks *and* tone.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali
    Mine has a Bubinga top. I love it and can't say enough great things about it. I owned a 6 for awhile too with a Walnut top. I really haven't
    noticed any drastic difference in the tone consequent of the body woods. I think most of the tone comes from what the fretboard to the bridge is constructed of, that includes electronics.

    I'm seriously considering picking up one with a flame maple top just b/c it looks cool. You won't be disappointed with the Cirrus line. They can be had for great prices new and phenomenal prices used for ALL the bass you get. They're great instruments.


    Sorry, this one isn't for sale. ;)[​IMG]
     
  4. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    No I guess I haven't. There have always been other factors added in the equation.
     
  5. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    Thanks for the info. Lucky for me there is a bubinga one just like yours available on...you-know-what. :)
     
  6. Im a sock

    Im a sock

    Dec 23, 2002
    Central MA
    My cirrus is flame maple top....and oh my... does it sound wonderful.

    *edited for dumb spelling... :rolleyes:
     
  7. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali

    I saw it on eBay too... Sweet.

    Good luck, I got mine for TheLowEnd.net for $750 shipped. Great buy.
     
  8. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    The only Cirrus combinations that I've had a chance to try are the bubinga/walnut and the redwood/alder. I bought a bubinga/walnut Cirrus 5. It had a more mellow tone that appealed to me more and there was a distinct difference between the tone of the two combinations.

    I can understand why Mike didn't hear much of a difference between the two that he tried since the only difference was the bubinga top on one. Most of the other woods on those basses is made of walnut. If I have any regrets about my Cirrus purchase, it's the fact that I didn't have an opportunity to try more of the different combinations of wood prior to buying mine.
     
  9. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    wow! great snag. That's the price I'm hoping for. Let me know if you spot another!
     
  10. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL

    So the bubinga/walnut was mellower, hmm. Was the redwood/alder punchier? BTW, I play rock and I've got an Ampeg/QSC/Avatar setup, if that helps.



    Yeah, I haven't been to a store so far that has more than one or two. When I get the time, I plan to check this one place out where I hope I can do some comparisons.
     
  11. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    This is maybe not a good comparison but here goes. IMO, I think that the redwood/alder would be more like a P-Bass and the bubinga/walnut would be more like a Jazz. I'm not saying that they are similar to those basses. I'm just trying to give you an idea of how they differ. For rock the redwood might work better for you but I really think that you could do that style of music very well with either.

    Try a few of them if you can. Like I said that's the only thing that I second guess myself about. I'm always going, "I wonder if that wenge/walnut or maple/alder would have been better?" :D ;) The fact is that I'm very happy with my decision so it's really a non-issue at this point.
     
  12. superphat

    superphat

    Sep 30, 2001
    woods most definitely contribute to the tone!
    but i would also venture that different people hear different woods differently.
    i.e. bubinga could sound very aggressive and mid-rangy to me, while to someone else it was more "mellow"??? (i don't know i'm not fully convinced though) :)

    i owned a bubinga/walnut cirrus and loved the *look* and tone was cool for most situations but still too aggressive in the midrange for me. (maybe it was the walnut back?) i tried out the maple and liked that much better as it was more "mellow" and "open" sounding to me.
    IIRC, rickreyn had good (but distinct) experiences with both the bubinga and tiger eye models. do a search, there were a few good threads about the cirrus models in general.
    You really should get to a peavey dealer and play them side by side, i'm sure you'll hear one calling to you more than the other. :)
     
  13. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
    The bubinga certainly called to me more than the redwood when I compared the two. :cool: :bassist:
     
  14. CaracasBass

    CaracasBass

    Jun 16, 2001
    Madrid, Spain
    I think you should read a book or made an internet search about tonal propierties between diferent woods. That is NOT only about the look, woods DO play an important part in the acustic (not amplified)sound of a bass, a guitar, a violin, etc etc etc etc etc.
     
  15. ebozzz

    ebozzz Supporting Member

    May 17, 2001
    Denver, Colorado
  16. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali
    I'd really like to try a maple freboard Cirrus. They're relatively new and I'm sure there aren't many in circulation yet. If I ran into one I'd probably waffle and buy it.





    Sweet!:bassist:
     
  17. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    Don't get me wrong, I know wood plays a part, but I just considered it to be near the bottom of the list. Strings, speakers, pickups, on-board pre, preamp, body construction, then...body wood. If it were acoustic then it would be a different story.
     
  18. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    You guys definitely answered my question! That is, body wood plays an important role (not just about looks).

    But it appears like I really need to get to stores before I buy because the differences are completely subjective. I've already played a couple of 'em and fallen in love, but I need to find a good Peavey dealer like superphat said.
     
  19. John Ruiz

    John Ruiz

    Oct 9, 2000
    Plano, Tx
    For an example of how woods affect tone you should check out the "listening room at Warrior's page AFAIK everything is the same on these basses except the woods.
     
  20. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    Hi guys,

    After trying some more out (walnut fretted, redwood fretted, maple fretless) and re-evaluating my needs, I've decided to buy a fretless Cirrus.

    That meant I had to let a SWEET bubinga/walnut fretted 5 slip through my fingers on ebay. (It sold for $735 and looked perfect!:bawl: )

    But after playing that maple fretless I decided that a Cirrus fretless is the ONE for me.

    I'm not entirely crazy about the maple top however. It was nice, and I'm considering it, but I like the look of walnut and bubinga better for some reason.