Peavey Grind Bridge

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by astar, Jun 10, 2004.

  1. astar


    Jun 10, 2004
    I have played a Ric for years but just bought my first 5 string because I needed the low B for a specific cover. I got a Peavey Grind because I felt it had the best price/quality ratio and will only play if for the tunes that require a low B. Anyway, the bridge has two ways that the string can be threaded through. The strings can be run through the back of the bridge, like on the Ric, or up through the bridge through the body.

    Is there a specific name for this kind of bridge and what are the advantages/disadvantages of routing the strings one way verses the other?
  2. many claim that stringing through the body gives better sustain and body coupling. many also claim that stringing through the bridge gives better attack and gets the classic sound.

    of course, those are also the same arguments used for neck thru v. bolt-on.

    my recommendation is to try stringing through the body the next time you buy strings. if you hear a difference, choose your preference, otherwise go with whichever is more convenient to you.

    out of curiousity, is the grind an NOS USA grind or is it a imported grind BXP?

  3. astar


    Jun 10, 2004
    Mine is the import. I was surprised however of it's quality. It is really well constructed. I have read that there are quality control issues with the BXP's though and that you should play it before you buy it. It took some searching, but I was able to finally find a local music store that had several in stock from which I could choose. My only complaint is that when I set the intonation, that I had to set the saddle back so far on the B string that it covers the hole in the bridge part way. I almost have to string it from the bridge. It otherwise plays very well. Good value considering it isn't my main axe.
  4. QC issues are part of import basses. i wish that weren't the case, but everyone from fender to schecter has to deal with it, and peavey is no different, unfortunately.

    as for setting the intonation, i used to do that, too. are you sure the relief and action are properly set, too? i never had to worry about where the saddles would be once i set the relief properly. then the intonation and action would take care of themselves.

    you may want to take it back to the store where you got it and have their tech give you a quick setup. that might fix your problems.