Peavey TNT 115-bw

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by jonasp, Sep 29, 2002.

  1. I have an older model of the TNT. on the back it says 150w rms. BUT...on the other side on the back, it says 500w. Does this mean it can handle 500w? if so, could i get a power amp and plug it in the "power amp in" jack and get about 500w out of it? thanks Pete
  2. hyperlitem

    hyperlitem Guest

    Jul 25, 2001
    Indianapolis, IN
    no that probably means how much voltage is going into it, it def does not mean it can handle 500 watts. I used to have one and i tried plugging my hartke 7000 into it, with my hartke 4x10. I had the volume at about 2 and it was fartin pretty bad. It wouldnt handle much more than 200 i would bet. You probably shouldnt plug an external poweramp into it at all though.
  3. Justin V

    Justin V

    Dec 27, 2000
    Alameda, CA
    I've got one of those to. The power amp in port is the last place the signal will go BEFORE it goes through the power amp. It makes more sense if you use the crossover feature with another amp (that's what I do). The 500w means that that's how much voltage the amp is drawing, not how much it can handle. On the my TNT the amp says that it can handle 160w, which sounds about right. Do NOT hook up a power amp to it. You'll probably end up blowing out your speaker (which if you've got the BW version, is a pretty darn good speaker).

    I usually have the volume at around 5-6 when I practice with my band with the pre-gain at around 2-3. That is, however, with the crossover in action. It allows for a more versatile tone. Without the bi-amp setup, it sounds pretty cruddy IMO. With both amps I can get pretty decent tone though.
  4. ashtray9


    Aug 1, 2002
    Tempe Arizona
    with the crossover in action? How do I use it? With another cabinet? Please explain to me how I can use the crossover on a 160w amp.
  5. Just to be anal about it, 500 Watts is the Power, or Wattage, it can draw from the wall, not the voltage. The voltage is 120V. Got it? :D

    All consumer goods that plug into the electrical grid are supposed to be marked with how much power they will pull from the outlet, along with the voltage expected (normally 120VAC, 60Hz in the US). This is so that you can make sure you aren't overloading an outlet or extension cord or whatever.

    Here's the manual: