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Pedulla Thunder BOLT 4 vs Roscoe 4

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Larzito, Jan 18, 2001.


  1. Larzito

    Larzito

    Aug 1, 2000
    Dallas, Texas
    Has anyone ever done a side by side comparison between a Roscoe 4 string (maple over mahogony) and a Pedulla Thunder Bolt 4 string? What are the differences in tone? Which one gets a deeper, richer sound?
     
  2. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    The T-bolt is more versatile.

    If you want a big, very boomy rich P bass but more modern tone get the Roscoe.

    The T-bolt can get close to it, but the Roscoes nail it IMHO.
     
  3. Larzito

    Larzito

    Aug 1, 2000
    Dallas, Texas
    I don't want "boomy." I'm not a big Pbass fan. I want it focused but deep. Pbass to me lacks focus...kinda hits the whole area instead of the head of the nail.
     
  4. Thumper

    Thumper Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2000
    Layton, UT
    Not quite what you are asking about, I have a Pedulla Rapture 5, and a Roscoe LG3005. The T-bolt is probably another animal, but it is related.

    The Rapture is nice, good deep tone, surprising vesatility for one P'UP, solid B string, and cuts through the mix.

    The Roscoe has good versatility, a great B string, powerful lows, crystal highs, and not only cuts through the mix, but it can dominate a band.
     
  5. Larzito

    Larzito

    Aug 1, 2000
    Dallas, Texas
    So if you could only take one to the gig, which one would you take?
     
  6. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Larzito, I'm sorry if my post was misunderstood.

    The Roscoe has P bass overtones(or maybe undertones:p?) but has a great deal more clarity and is more modern sounding.

    I've never played one live, but based on what I heard in the music store, I'll bet that they cut through like a mutha!

    I have heard that Thunderbolts do too. Munji, are you out there?:)
     
  7. spoolie

    spoolie

    Nov 30, 2000
    I have a Pedulla Rapture 4 and a Roscoe 4. I pretty much play them 50/50 on gigs and usually only take one at a time. I'm lazy. Both are great basses, I also have a very good 70 Precision but rarely use it (if that tells you anything). The Pedulla has more pure fundimental and is more focused on the bottom. It never sounds boomy. The Roscoe is more aggressive sounding with more mids (than the Pedulla) and is more compressed sounding. If I know we are playing a lot of rock, I take the Roscoe. If there's more jazz and R&B I take the Pedulla. If I don't know what the scene will be like, I take the Pedulla (it's more versatile). Both have Bart. preamps and will push the top end (if you want to dial it in) so this is not a factor between the two. Both cut through the mix very well. I guess I would sum this rambling up by describing the Pedulla as more "high fi" and refined and the Roscoe as "aggesive" and growling. Hope this helps, we all struggle to describe these sounds.
     
  8. Larzito

    Larzito

    Aug 1, 2000
    Dallas, Texas
    Spoolie...
    I have an idea. What if I was to replace the Roscoe pickups with Barts that are wound for the deep, rich tone? I like the aggressive playability of the Roscoe, with the smooth tone of the Pedulla. Any idea if the angled pickups in the Roscoe have angled pole pieces, or can I use stock Bart pickups? As always, I am searching for the ultimate ax, and if I clould combine these two elements, for me (at least this week anyway) this would be ideal.
     
  9. spoolie

    spoolie

    Nov 30, 2000
    Larzito ..

    I live in Greensboro (NC) where Roscoes are made so I see a fair number of them. I'm pretty sure Keith uses the same Bart pickup for the 4, 5 and 6 so it's a wide pickup when mounted on a 4 and I'm fairly sure it doesn't have pole pieces. I've never tried to take the covers off of mine. I think he has the pickups custom made for his basses by Bartollini (as does Pedulla). Keith is very accomodating so I would call him and ask what they could do to get the exact sound you are looking for. They sometimes use different brand pickups if asked and also do a lot with various wood mixtures to obtain a particular sound. It won't make any difference if it's a bass you are ordering new or one you already have. If it's a Roscoe, they will help you with modifications. The number is (336) 274-8810. There may be a toll-free number at the website http://www.roscoeguitars.com.

    I notice you have a Rapture. That makes you want a Thunderbolt doesn't it. I keep looking for a deal on one myself. Maybe one of you guys up the list can tell me if the Thunderbolt is significantly better than the Rapture.

    BTW the neck on my Roscoe is actually a tick better than my Pedulla, a little faster and I don't have to do any truss bar adjustments when the weather changes like I do with the Rapture.

     
  10. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Spoolie, I wouldn't say that the Thunderbolt is necessarily better than the Rapture, but it is more expensive, made out of fancier wood and has different pickup and electronics.

    The Rapture J is like an ultimate Jazz bass, with Bart pickups it is pretty versatile(more than a regular Jazz IMHO) and very quiet, but it is essentially a Jazz in tone and personality. Of course, you can get this bass in PJ or 1 MM looking soapbar as well.

    The Thunderbolt has 2 smaller soapbars, and the Thunderguts circuitry, which gives you 2 different preamp settings, and with the optional NTBT EQ I think it offers a ton more versatility than the Rapture does.
     
  11. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    I don't know if my T-bolt 5 fretless is comparable in sound to the fretted ones. Seems to me I played a fretted at GC a while back, and it was pretty versatile, clear, and punchy. A friend of mine has a T-bolt fretted and he loves it (he plays rock/classic rock. The thing about the T-bolt is it's very comfortable ... it's a small bass but puts out a lot of sound. The maple body gives it a nice "woody" tone. Mine doesn't have the 19mm string spacing, so it's real easy to reach the strings across the neck. It's really wild switching over to the Lakland, which has a 35" scale and 19mm spacing. Still easy to play, though. Dunno anything about Roscoe basses.
     
  12. Larzito

    Larzito

    Aug 1, 2000
    Dallas, Texas
    First, I would like to thank everyone for the good input. Here is the update. I took the pickups out of the Roscoe and they are the Bart BC4C, which are the "deep" version of the BC Soapbar line...so nix the theory of replacing the Barts with Barts. The TBolt uses the same pickups, but gets the rounder tone. Conclusion: WOOD MAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE! Now I know there may be subtle differences in the specs Roscoe and Pedulla give Bartolini, but essentially, the same pickups and preamp go in to both basses, yet they sound radically different. The Pedulla is made of solid maple, whereas the Roscoe is flame maple top over mahogony body. It pisses me off that unamplified, mahogony sounds so singy and cool, but amplified, lacks punch.

    My only other thought about modifying the Roscoe is to add the Aguilar preamp. Anyone tried the Ag (which is also the Sadowski)?

    I guess I'll have to ORDER a TBolt 4 and stop this maddening, obsessive rant. Unless anyone knows of one for sale...
     
  13. Thumper

    Thumper Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2000
    Layton, UT
    I was going to have a Roscoe built before I found one I wanted already put together. I spoke to Keith Roscoe and he very highly recommended swamp ash for the body (I told him I was after solid bottom, punch and attack). My only experience with mahogany was on a '76 T'bird which was a rather muffled sounding bass anyway. But in general, I believe that's what you get with mahogany.

    As for the pre-amp, he recommended the Aguilar for "slapping." I don't slap, so I can't comment as to what that might or might not do for you. If you don't have the 18v. upgrade, IMO you should.

    One other thing to consider here are the slanted pickups, I'm sure he does it to heighten the highs and lows, but straight mounted pickups are used on some Roscoe 5's (SKB), and all the 6's and 7's. Of course since you already have one, this may be a moot point....