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Pesky G-string

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by PSPookie, Dec 1, 2006.


  1. PSPookie

    PSPookie

    Aug 13, 2006
    Lubbock, TX
    I have an Ibanez SR905 and I would like to lower the action on my g string a bit; however, the bridge saddle is as low as it will go. The relief is set properly.

    So, what are my options?
     
  2. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    The neck angle needs to be adjusted. Not complicated. A quick search will give you the info you need.
     
  3. PSPookie

    PSPookie

    Aug 13, 2006
    Lubbock, TX
    pkr2, could you please elaborate? Are you refering to a truss rod adjustment?

    Searching for "neck angle" and "angle" proved fruitless.
     
  4. is your G string really tight? lol sorry but really is it tight or is it at a good tension? because tossing a little more slack on the string can sometimes changed how much you have to work with.
     
  5. PSPookie

    PSPookie

    Aug 13, 2006
    Lubbock, TX
    Thanks for the tip Johsua, but the bass in question is neck-through.
     
  6. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Which type bridge does your bass have? Ibanez used 3 or 4 different styles of bridge.

    How high is the G string? What is the relief set at?
     
  7. PSPookie

    PSPookie

    Aug 13, 2006
    Lubbock, TX
    The relief is set at 0.8 mm. It has an Accu-Cast B25 bridge. The G string is about 1/8" off of the fretboard past the 12th fret. (sorry for switching units on you)

    It is by no means unplayable, but I would like to be able to adjust it lower, should I choose to do so.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  8. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    PSP, The relief is just a bit higher than Ibanez recommends in thier setup manual. The spec is .3 to .5 mm. That doesn't seem like enough to cause the saddles to run out of adjustment range.

    I suggest that you loosen the TR untill you just start to get fret buzz anywhere on the neck. Then tighten the TR until the buzz just clears up, using your normal playing weight. That will be the optimum point of relief adjustment. If that doesn't take care of the problem, you probably should let an experienced tech take a look at it.

    The angle between the face of the body and the neck have changed and some very critical measurements will have to be made to pinpoint exactly what has went wrong.

    My gut feeling is that a very careful TR adjustment will make a noticeable improvement.

    Good luck, and let us know what the outcome turns out to be.

    Maybe someone else has some input.
     
  9. you could verry slightly file the saddle down
     

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