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pick/finger and also a lefthand thumb problem!

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Sprinkler, Aug 3, 2002.


  1. Sprinkler

    Sprinkler [account disabled]

    Jul 31, 2002
    Hello, i've been perfecting my style of fingering a couple of months now, but i have 2 problems.

    first - when i play with my fingers, i have to pull the strings pretty hard to get my sound as loud as with a pick, which means that i have to push harder with my lefthanded finger(to get no fretbuzz). is it something i'm doing wrong or should i just train on my fingerstrength?!

    second - when i'm playing on higher strings, i hate playing with my fingers. i dont know why, probably cuz they're so thin which makes it feel innatural, and the mellow sound

    and then my LH thumb problem: i cant get used to putting my thumb right back behind my fingers :mad:

    and it hurts pretty fast too!
     
  2. did you try playing closer to the bridge?
     
  3. StrudelBass

    StrudelBass

    Jul 6, 2002
    California
    Alright, first off, the Right Hand. Maybe your volume isn't up enough because I barely tap my strings and sound comes out. If that doesn't work try playing in between the neck and the bridge. Theres less tension there then near the bridge.

    As for the thumb... just try to keep the thumb in the center of the neck. This usually works for me. If its hurting chances are you're pressing to much.

    But don't take my word for it, I'm no expert and the way I'm explaining this probably doesn't sound correct.:oops:
     
  4. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Sounds to me that rather than trying to play hard with your fingers, you should try to play lighter with your pick.
     
  5. Sprinkler

    Sprinkler [account disabled]

    Jul 31, 2002
    one thing i know for sure... it's my fingers that have to create the sound, not my amp!
     
  6. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    You're not playing double bass, TWINKLER. There are several schools of thought about tone production, and many top players come from the "crank your amp up, and let it do the work" school. Your amp is part of your instrument, seeing as you can't make any usable sound without it.
     
  7. Sprinkler

    Sprinkler [account disabled]

    Jul 31, 2002
    Lol. So when I have a slapping part in my song, i have to put my volume down :rolleyes: djeez
     
  8. I agree, the sound is comming from the amp not the actual instrument itself (use an acoustic bass if you want that!) Turn it up loud and play softly and you won't have to work as hard :)
     
  9. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    That's the point I made at the beginning of this thread. Learn to play softer, both with a pick and when you slap. You'll make huge progress is your sound, technique and tone production when you learn that you don't have to kill the strings when you slap and pop! All you have to do is bounce your thumb off the string, you don't have to crush the string against the fingerboard.

    :rolleyes:
     
  10. I personally think this is very problematic because the fingernoise that is caused by using roundwound strings does not lessen when you play softer but it will be amplified more if the amp is turned up.
     
  11. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    again, a technique matter.
     
  12. Pluck softer. Period.
    A pick sounds like a pick, fingers sounds like fingers.
    If you like the volume of the pick then stay with the pick otherwise turn up the amp.
    If you want the attack of a pick then use it do not try to get the tone with your fingers if you do not hurt yourself today you will in time. I am a person that makes that a fact. I was young and plucked hard I got older and had to go the therapy to fix damaged forearm tendons. I am better now but somedays it still hurts. Do yourself a favor and thing for today and the future.
     
  13. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Get a volume pedal.

    When you play finger, keep it wide open.

    When you slap or pick turn it down until you find the right spot.
     
  14. just_a_poser

    just_a_poser

    Apr 20, 2002
    When I first started my bass teacher told me not to play hard with my right hand. He said to give it a light touch, because when you're playing a gig on a nice big amp, it won't sound good if you pulling the strings too hard.

    I think someone else said it to, but I'll say it too. If you want the sound and tone of when you use a pick...use a pick.