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Picking a college

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Tortuga, Jul 28, 2007.


  1. Tortuga

    Tortuga

    Dec 28, 2006
    East Bay Area
    sucks...:meh:

    discuss!
     
  2. no **** sherlock that tasks suck more scooping up dog poo!
     
  3. !Rob!

    !Rob!

    Mar 2, 2007
    Barber or Clown :hyper:

    J/K, I know, it's a really tough call

    Best of luck/success
     
  4. Tortuga

    Tortuga

    Dec 28, 2006
    East Bay Area
    yup, and the fact that the UC system is totally F'd up doesnt help at all
     
  5. community college is the way to go
     
  6. I waited until about 2 months before most application deadlines to start looking at colleges. I am a HUGE slacker. However, I really had the academics to go nearly anywhere, but not enough extracurriculars. I hate the college search, it felt like I couldn't get into a school without jumping through flaming hoops for them... when in reality I am paying them a crap load of money, so it shouldn't matter how many pointless highschool clubs I was in. So I joined a bunch my senior year to buff up my resume, and applied to only 4 schools.

    Anyway, I ended up going to Virginia Tech, and I love it. As soon as I saw the campus I knew I wanted to go there. It's an amazing engineering school (my major) and the campus and location are amazing. I saw it in the winter. It was snow covered, and all the buildings are made of stone and remind me of castles.

    If you are in any way considering engineering... you should check out VT. I am loving every bit of it.
     
  7. Tortuga

    Tortuga

    Dec 28, 2006
    East Bay Area
    ah but im a californian boy, and while i have relitives back east, virigina is a bit out of the question due to the out of state tution fees.

    However I think I found somewhat of a dream college in UC Santa Cruz, it has a majority of students studying history or social sciences ( my major(s) ), so now I got something to go for , but i definetly need to get into some clubs to buff up my resume as well. Luckily I have a few good teachers that are willing to write me recomendation letters , so that should help cover for my lack of club participation lol.
     
  8. Yeah right. I'm totally looking forward to University!
    Of course I am taking Theatre Acting...

    :hyper:
     
  9. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    Do as professional athletes - pick the one that offers the most money. :smug:

    You can get a great education at practically any college. You will likely find great teachers in all departments/colleges of a university. All university libraries have great resources, but you can also check out materials from libraries across the country (maybe even internationally).

    Although some universities have better facilities than others. This doesn't always equate with being a better school.

    Personally, I've gigged with graduates from my alma mater (Western Washington University), University of Washington, and a handful of graduates from Berklee College of Music. It might just be the lack of an accurate sample, but I've found the average graduate from UW and WWU to be more competent than the average Berklee grad. This isn't necessarily true for a larger sample, and there are unquestionably extremely talented musicians coming out of Berklee. My point is that many students might be more proficient and successful going to a $5k a year school with a music department with little or no reputation. A school with $30,000 tuition isn't necessarily going to be $25,000 better.

    With a 4-year degree, you aren't expected to master a particular field, so I recommend trying to get a well rounded education. Sometimes it is smart to pick a major that doesn't require 180 credits of courses in the major. I was a history major, which was 60 credits. It allowed be to take many music classes, over 30 credits of audio engineering, and a lot of other subjects I was passionate about.

    After high school 95% of people don't really have a clue what they want to do with their life. I just graduated college and I'm still very uncertain about a lot of things. High schoolers and even a lot of fresh grads from college have not spent much time in the real world, so I feel that what you major in is not as important as people make it seem. Career options were never on the top of my mind. I now have a degree and can start looking at careers in the real world to see what I like.

    One regret I have about college is that I wish I started to build up a resume. I have very little work experience, so finding jobs that won't hurt my ego is extremely difficult. Volunteer work can be great -- there are many opportunities. Volunteer work isn't as time consuming as part time jobs, and it still can go on a resume. You can explore what you are passionate about with volunteer work. Also, I'm pretty sure you can use volunteer work as a tax right-off.


    This advice is just based on my experience after recently graduating. YMMV
     
  10. AdlerAugen

    AdlerAugen

    Aug 9, 2006
  11. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    The choice was easy for me... I live in Columbia, MO, home of the University of Missouri. I want to go to Berklee College of Music eventually, though, even if it's just for a year. I've gone there two summers now and I'm in love with the place.

    - Dave
     
  12. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    My god, man, don't lie to the poor guy. You can get an "education" at practically any college. There are about a dozen schools in the USA that will give you a *great* education. They are Harvard, Yale, Penn, Princeton, Stanford, MIT, Duke, Dartmouth, Columbia, The Univ. of Chicago, Cornell, and Brown, not necessarily in that order.

    Don't take my word for it; listen to this direct quote from a third-year (junior) at the University of Missouri, which was ranked #88 on US News' Top 100 Universities. She was writing about a petition against a new "nuisance party" ordinance in effect in our city, which allows police to issue a $500 ticket to the host(s) of parties violating noise, littering, public drunkenness, etc violations:

    "This law is evil and is borderline unconstitutional. How the hell did this become the Land of the not so Free? They are taking away our right to peacefully assemble. Our four fathers would be ashamed of what they are doing but they would also be ashamed of us. We need to fight this with every fiber of our beings. Maybe we should make one of those anonymous complaints when the land lord who started this throws his annual christmas party. Lets let him feel what its like to be treated like a sub-human by the cops. The cops tackled my ass for cooperating so i'm fighting this tooth and nail. I'm in. What ever we have to do. Lets get the bastards!"

    This is unedited for grammar, punctuation, spelling, or capitalization. Remember, she's a junior, which means she's four semesters away from holding a full-fledged University of Missouri degree.

    Here's another example, this time from a senior, about to get his degree in economics. Did I mention that he writes for the school paper?

    "In the economy with the least rules is the most efficient. Although we know there will be inherent rules to prevent complete efficiency, $500 is undue and too big of a burden. If theres one thign Im sure of it will be this evil taxation reduced."

    Something to think about...

    - Dave

    (More thinking: )
     
  13. AdlerAugen

    AdlerAugen

    Aug 9, 2006
    Lol good thing I'm not going to missouri then. Seems like an out of the way state anyway. Hawaii, california, washington, or new york are probably the only states I'd want to go to college in, perhaps pennsylvania.
     
  14. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    I lived in PA for a few years. Penn & Duke are great schools there. UCLA is also a good school, and of course, Columbia and NYU are in New York.

    - Dave
     
  15. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    The point I tried to make is that the student is the most important factor in how great of an education he or she receives. I'd disagree with the common assertion that those dozen schools 'give' a great education. In order for a great education to be imparted, students must actively learn. A great education is only given if a student is does the most he or she can to receive said education.

    If students try to make the best of things, they will most likely enjoy themselves and do well with their studies. If students have a half-arse work ethic and feel no motivation or passion to accomplish anything, it does not matter what school they go to. I've run into folks from 'prestigious' schools who fall very short of impressive.
     
  16. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    Aaron, I agree that the student is the most important factor. I just think it's incorrect to say that you can get a "great" education at (practically) any college. I think that if you apply yourself, you can get a decent education at any college. But, in all honesty, do you think you're going to get the same education, if you are smart & apply yourself, at a school with an SAT cut-off of 1000 as you will at a school with an SAT cut-off of 1400? Better schools attract better teachers, and being around equally hard-working students can do a lot for the level of education you achieve in the end (IMO/IME).

    I have a unique perspective on this situation - my parents both attended Ivy League schools, but settled down in Columbia, Missouri, home of the University of Missouri. They both worked for the university for several years before going into private practice. Visiting my parents' alma maters, I have met & chatted with many professors at that level - some of my parents' college friends went on to teach, also. I am also enrolled at the University of Missouri as a part-time student. The differences are simply mind-boggling. In 1997, I started a petition to the Columbia Public Schools Board of Education to introduce "tracking" into our school system (separating kids into different classes based on intelligence). I took a lot of crap for that, but by seventh grade, I was learning absolutely nothing in school. My vocabularly words in 7th grade were "the" and "can't" (not kidding), and at the time, my favorite author was Tom Clancy. There were other students in my class who, quite literally, could not read. Guess where the teachers spent most of their time? Obviously, they couldn't fail everyone, so they would give me a book to read, and work with the slow kids. Everyone in the school board tried to pretend that this wasn't hurting anyone, but the slow kids were upset because 20 minutes of every class was spent working on things completely above their heads (for the faster kids' benefit), and the faster kids were upset, because 40 minutes of every class was spent working on things they learned from their parents at age 5. I eventually skipped 8th grade, homeschooled one semester of ninth grade, and in 1998, with the help of several concerned parents, I helped found a new private school in my city (very similar to the one discussed about 10 minutes into the video posted below). I'm certain that the same principles apply at the college level, and in my limited experience (I'm 23, but I've only taken one full semester of college, because I left school to play music), this is also the case.

    For more info, check out this book:

    http://www.amazon.com/Education-Myths-Special-Interest-Believe-Schools/dp/0742549771

    and this 40-minute special from 20/20 with Jon Stossel:



    - Dave
     
  17. AdlerAugen

    AdlerAugen

    Aug 9, 2006
    lucky for me I've gone to private schools my whole life...'cause hawaii's have the reputation of being the worst, and it's quite believable.
     
  18. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    In my experience, post-secondary education hasn't catered to the bottom of the class. I've been in many classes with intelligent and ambitious students where less than 10% of the class gets A's. It might have been my university or department, but the teachers didn't avoid failing people. I remember my first quarter. My jaw dropped when I received syllabi. I was assigned 500-1000 pages of reading a week. The readings weren't light. They were written by post-modern academics dropping their favorite buzzwords and self-coined phrases. In my colloquium classes, I was expected to fully understand, analyze, and intelligently discuss the readings in order to pass.
     
  19. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    Aaron, I'm glad your experience was better than mine. In my freshman-level Ethics class, we were paired off so that each student had a fellow student to do a round of editing on his paper before we turned them in. I really wish I still had the paper I recieved (it's on my old computer, which suffered a fatal crash three years ago). This student could not spell Socrates and his paper made no sense at all. I'm paraphrasing, but I remember something like this: "Socrites was a great teacher. He teached many students before he died. A lot of people didn't like him because he said stuff that they didn't like and they didn't want him to say it but he keeped on teaching anyways because he knew it was right." I took it to my professor, because I told him that editing this paper would essentially be re-writing this paper - there was no discussion, no hyopthesis, no statement or point of any kind other than a discordant biography. My professor said not to worry about it and just to do the best I could do. You would *never* see this at Penn or Harvard because students like that don't even apply. I learned nothing from that assignment. That student ended up with a B+.

    - Dave
     

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