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Pickup change?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by nubassplayer, Mar 27, 2001.


  1. nubassplayer

    nubassplayer

    Mar 26, 2001
    Indiana
    I want to get a BC Rich beast bass. Everyone says the pickups suck. How do you switch it? Is it hard? I'm new, so I don't know very much.
     
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    A couple things;

    - Don't get new pickups because, "everyone said they suck." It's easy to tell others what to do with money and gear that's not coming out of your pocket, (I'm keeping that in mind right now). Get new pickups because YOU say they suck.

    This means you need to try the bass you want before buying at a local music store, or at least buy it from someplace that will take it back, (Ed Roman?), if you find it isn't what you hoped for. Determine not only if it sounds good to you, but also if it feels like it "fits" you. People find some necks, body styles, etc., affect their ability to play well. BC Rich and his Goth body styles are geared for the "nubassplayer" market. As a newbie, you're swayed by looks right now and that's normal. But you will be much happier, believe me, once you've owned the bass a while and your ear gets more sophisticated.

    If you determine that new pickups are the answer, I wouldn't suggest putting them in yourself, unless you are one of the whiz kids in the electronics program at a vocational school. I've been playing over 30 years, and I still wouldn't replace my own pickups because I have no training, nor any friends/family who are qualified to do it. If you don't know the difference between wiring in parallel and wiring in series, you probably shouldn't attempt the job. Plus, by having a tech or luthier at a music store do it, they're responsible if something is wrong.

    If you decide on new pickups, I think the Beast uses a J pickup and a P pickup. You could check out www.bartolini.net and www.basslines.com . They make pickups that a lot of pro's use.

    To learn a little more on pickups, check out www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/serpar.html The information at the site mentions guitars, but much of it is generic and applies to bass.

    BTW, does the chick come with it? www.edromanguitars.com/bcgbeast.htm :D
     
  3. nubassplayer

    nubassplayer

    Mar 26, 2001
    Indiana
    Thanx for the info. I'll look into it. Your right about the looks thing. It just looks so awesome.(unlike the chick)
     
  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    You're smarter than I was in my later teens. I rarely listened to anyone much older than I.
     
  5. nubassplayer

    nubassplayer

    Mar 26, 2001
    Indiana
    Don't give me too much credit. I might get a big head.
     
  6. dytakeda

    dytakeda

    Jul 18, 2000
    Generally, replacing pickups "like for like" (passive) is fairly simple if you know how to solder. Every pickup has two leads, a signal and ground. You unsolder those leads from the existing pickup (they're attached to the pots). Solder the new leads in their place. The mounting is simple- just the small screws that you see from the exterior of the pickup.

    Of course, some aftermarket pickups have coil tap leads, built in preamps (EMG), etc. which may require extra switches, replacement of the controls and output jack, and so on. These pickups come with instructions, so if you can follow instructions and handle a screwdriver and soldering iron, you should be able to do this job.

    Hey, you think those "repair techs" over at the local guitar shop went to Cal Tech or MIT?

    -Oh yeah... I second the idea that you should listen to the pickups before making any decision. AND... if you stay with the stock pickups, no one in the audience will care. No one (except other musicians) ever said, "Man, I did the bass player, but his tone lacked the punch in the midrange and detail in the high end that a set of low Hz EMG's would provide".
     
  7. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I don't know what kind of places you play, dytakeda, but there are few people in clubs I play who could say they did me, (and none of them are musicians). :D
     
  8. nubassplayer

    nubassplayer

    Mar 26, 2001
    Indiana
    How long did it take you to get good enough to play in a club?
     
  9. dytakeda

    dytakeda

    Jul 18, 2000
    that should be "dig" the bass player...

    Ooops!
     
  10. dytakeda

    dytakeda

    Jul 18, 2000
    Not long at all... 6 months? But that was a different time, and different clubs.

    Yes, 1979 and the sounds of punk rock and new wave filled the air!

    Don't think there's a "Good enough" standard to play clubs. I've seen some horrible, terrible, couldn't play at all bands in "clubs". But that was just my opinion. Maybe someone else liked them.

    Get out there and do it. You're certainly not playing to entertain yourselves, so only you (and your band) can determine when your music is ready to be presented to an unsuspecting audience.