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Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Osborne Instr, Oct 9, 2009.


  1. Osborne Instr

    Osborne Instr

    Mar 13, 2009
    Neck laminates that are not straight(cuved, zig zag ect.). I searched and have not found a thing.
    Ive seen the melted top thing on conklins, just wondering if anybody did it on the neck or body wood.
    thanks
     
  2. the laminates themselves? or just the fingerboard.

    The neck lams are straight for strength.
     
  3. Osborne Instr

    Osborne Instr

    Mar 13, 2009
    just the neck, no fingerboard.
     
  4. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Sep 8, 2008
    i dont think that anyone has done it. i would assume that having cross grain glue joints would most likely break when any kind of pressure was put on them. tried and true straight lams are the only way id say so.
     
  5. jordan_frerichs

    jordan_frerichs

    Jan 20, 2008
    Nebraska
    i have looked into that, and structurally it will not work. the wood needs to be symetrical. (that is why on necks with laminates, it is all symetrical. if the sides have different qualities, then it is eventually going to warp and twist under tension. it can be done safely on a fingerboard though, as long is the fb is not abnormally thick. the closest you will find to what you are looking for is tapered laminates.
     
  6. DSB1

    DSB1

    Mar 8, 2006
    Where did you look into the subject? Can you cite anything?

    You may be talking about using different species of wood in adjacent laminations - I would also hesitate mixing and matching species or even the same wood from a different tree (IE a lamination of say, mahogany and the adjacent lamination be of mahogany be from a different tree).

    Perhaps I am taking what you said out of context but I don't see how a neck with curved laminates "will not work". The challenge of course would be mating the surfaces accurately.

    For clarity, what I am visualizing what the original poster meant was a neck with "wavy" laminates that make long gradual bends going up the neck. Again, if they were married up in a precise manner and of the same species and tree per side, I see no reason why this would not work. You would have more surface area to adhere to per laminate.
     
  7. DSB, i would think with truss rod adjustments, and string tension pulling backwards, curved lams could create a twist. were a "softer" side would give in before the others.
     
  8. DSB1

    DSB1

    Mar 8, 2006
    Please elaborate, I don't understand what you mean by "softer sides".
     
  9. jordan_frerichs

    jordan_frerichs

    Jan 20, 2008
    Nebraska
    some woods are less dense/stable and bend easier and/or faster than others. the side more prone to blending/flexibility will stat to twist which is a problem that is more complicated then the common forward and backwards bowing of a neck. if a neck becomes badly twisted many toss out the neck and start over, as the easyiest way to repair it.
     
  10. DSB1

    DSB1

    Mar 8, 2006
    As I stated before I was not talking about building a neck with different laminations per side - IE a neck with say one purpleheart piece and its opposite piece is made of a different species entirely.

    The subject of the thread, as I interpret the first post, is laminations that curve - I see nothing about necks that have differing adjacent laminations.
     
  11. Osborne Instr

    Osborne Instr

    Mar 13, 2009
    I fully understand that any wood is going to move a little, i just dont see it being as big a problem as anything else.
    as far as warping, maybe on a smaller neck(maybe) but if you use 3 lams with the outside woods being the same i think it will work.

    So in the interest of the topic im gonna roll the dice and try it on a build im doing for myself.
    zebra center wenge on the sides and its a 12 string(singles).
    As far as breaking apart because of grain direction, i dont think the "waves" are gonna be as sharp as you think, more of a soft wave is what im thinking. But if it breaks i guess lesson learned on my part.

    Thank you guys very much for the input.
     
  12. Aye good luck, Ill stick to straight lams : )

    I dont think it would break, it just doesnt seem that it would be as stable. But Ive never tried, and honestly dont plan on it!
     
  13. DSB1

    DSB1

    Mar 8, 2006
    Please keep us posted! I am interested in this project.
     
  14. Hi.

    From an engineering standpoint I'd say that it's perfectly doable.

    The equipment needed to make the laminate blocks won't be too difficult either, but whether the results are as expected or not, that's anyones guess.

    I joint the chorus and encourage You to try it, then you will know and hopefully tell us too.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  15. jordan_frerichs

    jordan_frerichs

    Jan 20, 2008
    Nebraska
    that would be qa pretty big gamble, doing it on a nice 12 string. i am also intersted in this. is there a way you can do a test piece, to find the best method of doing this, and giving it a strength/stability test? it might be a good idea to do it as a bolt-on, so incase things start to go bad, you are only out a neck. good luck! keep us updated!
     
  16. DSB1

    DSB1

    Mar 8, 2006
    Calculated risk, but gamble certainly not. Besides, if you're going to fail, fail at full speed.
     
  17. jordan_frerichs

    jordan_frerichs

    Jan 20, 2008
    Nebraska
    hmmm. i like that qoute;)
     

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