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Playing when your mentors and the musicians that helped you are in the crowd

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by OogieWaWa, Nov 17, 2018.


  1. OogieWaWa

    OogieWaWa

    Mar 17, 2013
    Oak Harbor, OH
    This is going to be weird. For the first time since I have been playing for 12 years (since I was 50) we're playing a place where it's likely that most of the musicians l learned to play with, and past band members, may show up for our gig tonight! Finally playing at a small venue (nice word for dive bar) and a lot of the people I started with are going to show up!!! The guys I started jamming with my first time on a stage. The guys from the first four or five bands I played with. Some folks that I've been going to see for years! It all just worked out for once, but it seems its ALL at once! Seems they're not all playing out tonight.

    And I have to admit I'm a bit nervous for a change! Not the typical jazzed-up thing before a normal gig, I got over the scared thing years ago.

    Thoughts? Advice?

    I owe all of these folks so much! So many good friends I've gained over the last decade or so.

    This may be up to a dozen or more folks. And I reeeeally don't want to hose it. None of them have ever heard me sing before, either.

    Wish me luck!
     
    oZZma likes this.
  2. OogieWaWa

    OogieWaWa

    Mar 17, 2013
    Oak Harbor, OH
    Oh, and I will announce and thank each and every one of them. Even if everything falls through and only three or four show up. You know how it goes when people say they will be there.
     
  3. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Smile and have fun! Good luck.:thumbsup:
     
    fdeck and OogieWaWa like this.
  4. eJake

    eJake

    May 22, 2011
    New Orleans
    Best advice I can give is don't try to do too much. Once in a while when there are musicians in the crowd that I respect I start thinking to myself "I'm gonna impress all these people with my chops" and start doing stuff I don't normally do. It's dumb and I always get myself in trouble.

    Don't try to be the bass player you're not. Just do the stuff you have rehearsed and have fun!!
     
    Mr_Moo likes this.
  5. LBS-bass

    LBS-bass Supporting Member

    Nov 22, 2017
    California
    Sounds like a fun night, and you'll have lots of love in the audience. The best nights are the ones where friends show up to cheer us on. Remember to relax, no one is there to criticize you, and remember that a mistake is just that. If you make one, it's no big deal, we all do! Smile and enjoy the fact that you have friends who care enough come out and support you. Have fun :)
     
  6. fhm555

    fhm555 So FOS my eyes are brown Supporting Member

    Feb 16, 2011
    Since i learned from my dad, it was always weird when him and my mom would show up at the gut bucket places we were working. Not them being there so much as it was a couple of normal people in a not so normal place. But they used to show up quite a bit.
     
    bound'n'blocked likes this.
  7. Both of my parents are very musically inclined, I think my dad more so, because he was always so improvisational on the piano. My mom played as well. They are older now and don't play anymore. I was always nervous playing around them. My mom had said once to me that she would not come see me play in a bar. So I had played for years before they saw me play "professionally" at a restaurant, so I kind of had the nerves worked out by then, but it was still kind of strange. I do however remember a bass player friend of mine who was one of the top players in the area walking in one night when I was playing and I got extremely nervous.

    BnB
     
    fhm555 likes this.
  8. chadds

    chadds

    Mar 18, 2000
    Crosby Stills & Nash performed at Woodstock to 4-500,000 people. That wasn’t the issue. In the dark surrounding them in a semicircle were all of their heroes. Pro very famous musicians like the Airplane, Joan Baez etc. etc. That according to Steve Stills was what made them nervous.

    Two things. Dwelling on stuff can be a distraction. Get some control of your thoughts. :)
    Sir Lawrence Olivier said, “If you’re not nervous before you go on, you have nothing to say.” Hmmmmmmm

    Play from the heart. You know the tunes in your head. So put the real deal, the feeling in it. That’s why people go to see us live.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
    bound'n'blocked likes this.
  9. Russell L

    Russell L

    Mar 5, 2011
    Cayce, SC
    When I played full-time guitar back in the day a friend of mine who played guitar with Sinatra would often show up at our club when he was off. Yes, it made me a tad nervous, but in the end I just forgot abour it and did my thing. After all, what difference does it make? Just play like you always do.
     
  10. mellowinman

    mellowinman Free Man

    Oct 19, 2011
    Minneapolis
    NEVER BE INTIMIDATED. EVER.
     
    OogieWaWa likes this.
  11. hrodbert696

    hrodbert696 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    So... how did it go?
     
  12. OogieWaWa

    OogieWaWa

    Mar 17, 2013
    Oak Harbor, OH
    Ha, darned flighty musicians, only two showed up. Like I tell everyone, never trust a musician. But I was kinda bummed like that, as much as I go see others. Meh.

    It was the first time either of them had heard me sing.

    But yeah, I was fine. I've taught industrial classes for decades, and I realized it's the same thing. For anything, as long as you feel that what you are presenting has value or worth, there isn't any reason for angst, even in a room full of experts. I know I can perform well enough to stand among them now.
     

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